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Chainsaw blood splatter


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#1 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 09:04 PM

Can someone please offer their thoughts or proven approach to an inexpensive, but realistic blood splatter (on a wall) as if a chainsaw were used on a victim?

My initial thought is a large well soaked paint brush flicked so as to cause a splatter, but I don't know.

Ideally I would like to try one of those old standard shots of the shadow of victim and killer as the killer lowers a chainsaw, then splatter the blood onto the wall in their cast shadow.


Thanks :)
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 09:45 PM

I'm not an effects expert but I think you're going to have to experiment with several techniques to see what works best with the viscosity of blood you're using, and which technique will allow you a degree of control (finer/coarser, more/less) on the day. If you've ever worked with paint, stain or varnish you'll know that there's no such thing as a one-size-fits-all approach, and any artistic endeavor requires some degree of manual control.

Every blood effect I've witnessed on set has used different techniques, often for the same effect. You might consider different brushes or even a syringe or turkey baster (again, I'm not an FX guy).
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#3 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 11:51 PM

Actually a paintbrush would probably work, 'course you'll probably want a continuous spattering of blood as long as the chainsaw's cutting up the victim mixed with bloody bits of bone, flesh, skin and hair also flung onto the wall. :D

I would use a pump up bug sprayer for the blood and a bucket with a mix of fake blood, plaster chips, gelatin and crape hair scooped out and hand tossed by grips wearing plastic raincoats and rubber gloves. Set the FX equipment just behind the lights and use a longer lens so you can set the camera back out of the way ORRR cover it with a rain Barney and with any luck some of the blood will splash on the front optical glass which would look REAL cool. B)
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 12:34 AM

Remember those old commercials? "Get a Wagner!"

A paint sprayer could work for ya, with some kind of thin nozzle to spread it :)
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 12:53 AM

ORRR cover it with a rain Barney and with any luck some of the blood will splash on the front optical glass which would look REAL cool. B)


Worked in Children of Men! I think JSB is onto something here: including differently-originated "chunks" of splatter could add a sick, visceral touch to the blood splatter. "Shock value" doesn't have any value unless it catches your audience by surprise....
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#6 Crystal REVE Angeles

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 01:30 AM

What if you used like a weed wacker and slowly added small amounts of blood to watch it spray on wall like chainsaw? or put a bowl of blood underneath and slightly dip as its turned on... I am not a FX person but i was sitting here thinking of things i would test to do that effect..... when i think of more ill hit you up.


Crystal
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#7 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 05:12 AM

I appreciate the suggestions. Each has valid elements worth factoring into my fiendish experiments.

Flying human matter is very appealing. Good call there!

Crystal, there is something wonderfully demented about your weed whacker idea.
I don?t have a weed whacker, but along the same lines I can see a roller pan of raw chicken skin and blood soaked pork rinds being flung by a high speed drill with a wire brush attachment on it working out rather well.

The thoughts on shock element as well as the filter or rain Barney suggestions are great too.
If I can get that initial wall splatter, but also bring the gore closer to the audience by shooting through and unexpectedly splattering a pane of glass, then it might be that much more visually exciting while also inexpensively providing a means for protecting the camera.

Thank you all.
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#8 Crystal REVE Angeles

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 02:17 AM

Anytime Buddy, i hope i can help in anyways, i like to be creative and to be honest i am addicted to horror, most of my film collection is horror and honestly if you watch DEXTER the showtime tv show, he shows some ideas to in some scenes. He is a forensic cop / serial killer.... so as i have watched many horror films, attending horror conventions and studied some stuff....i have been wondering how theyh do it myself.

I hope i can help in anyway, as i said.

just try it and please keep m e updated on how it went.
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