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Basic Light Meter


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#1 Evan Pierre

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 03:24 AM

Hello there, for the holidays this year I am going to be purchasing my first light meter. I've been eyeing the Sekonic L-358 FLASH MASTER that a friend recommended and it looks like a great choice so far. My price limit is pretty much going to be about $300. If you have any suggestions feel free to post them!

Thank you :]

-Evan Pierre
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 09:14 AM

You should run a search in the forum for light meters, the subject comes up regularly.

http://www.cinematog...;hl=light meter
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#3 Tony Brown

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 09:36 AM

Kenko (formally Minolta) http://www.parkcamer...9/categoryID/46

Incident / spot, good size, reliable and unbelievable battery life.
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#4 Walter Graff

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 09:56 AM

That seems like a good, afordable choice, that will do the trick. May I also suggest you use it to shoot stills? You will get a much better grounding and understanding of light, light meters, and the relation to a camera if you shoot stills and become good at exposure at that level.
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#5 Jess Haas

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 09:30 PM

The 358 is a great little meter. Mine has treated me well for a number of years now despite loads of abuse.

I would also suggest taking a look at Spectra's offerings but that would probably run you closer to $400.

~Jess
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#6 Brian Rose

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 09:56 PM

My first light meter was a Spectra Pro, and I still use it today. A really nice nuts and bolts, no frills setup. And you'll have money left over. Just make sure to buy from someone reputable, or get it serviced/calibrated before you use it. As for spotmeters, I favor the Minolta M. Sturdy and very compact. Ansel Adams spoke highly of it in his two volumes on photography. The only drawback is it does not have a shutterspeed for cinema (aka 1/50 or 1/48). But it is very easy to convert using 1/60. Hope this helps!
Best,
BR
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Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera