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Choosing the right stock and lights


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#1 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 06:39 PM

Hi! I am new to the film stock - shot bw 7222 recently and that is it. So far. So decided to do some colour film as well. Shooting in about two weeks.

The look I want: quite contrasty (think scenes from Inside Man (when cops are questioning the suspects). Blue-greenish. Quite cold, but more metal, then just plain blue or green.

Shooting on 16mm.
Probably will not shoot reversal (even the look of Inside Man I want was shot on it) - for the cost and development problems. Will telecine. But wouldn't rely on post too much.

At the moment choosing between '29, '79 and '74, also thinking about '18 - but is it contrasty? Probably will go for Kodak - we have some student discounts here. Will use a set of 6 redheads with gels to light the shots (can't get anything bigger because of safety issues).

Also, shooting fluorescent lights on tungsten stock - they come out green? Is it correct? If so - how much green? Or is it just going to be very slight tone?

Here are some location photos (all scenes will be interior):
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Couple more on flickr.

Any advise, especially on the stock to use would be much appreciated!
Thanks a lot in advance!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 07:03 PM

Fluorescents can be warm or cold (closer to tungsten or daylight) and vary by how much green there is in them. Most film stocks and video cameras handle it OK, just a hint of green except for the old cheap Cool White tubes. The main reason to worry is when mixing your own lighting, if you want to match the amount of greeness.

Your still photos looks like the camera was set to tungsten balance, which is probably the correct call at night unless shooting under exclusively Cool White fluorescents, in which case, 250D stock may be an option if there is enough light.

None of the modern color neg stocks are particularly contrasty except for Fuji Vivid 160T, which is probably too slow, unless you can push it a stop -- if your meter on location tells you that you have enough light for 250 to 320 ASA. If so, pushed Vivid 160T may be closer to that "Inside Man" look you want, though you're still going to have to most of that in color-correction later.
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#3 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 07:10 PM

Thanks a lot, David!

What about the Kodak's? Which one would you suggest to choose?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 07:13 PM

Thanks a lot, David!

What about the Kodak's? Which one would you suggest to choose?


If you want contrast, not '29. I'd probably go with '18 (or '19 if you can get it).

Or 200T '17 rated at 400 ASA with a neg skip-bleach if you want a lot of contrast.
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#5 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 07:24 PM

Thanks!

Have to order the stock in two days.
A lot of stuff to think about now :)
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#6 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 12:44 PM

Decided to go with '18.
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