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Chinon XL555 Macro & Ektachrome 64T


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#1 Steven Kajorinne

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 10:10 PM

I think I might have run into a problem. I have a Chinon XL555 Macro that I received from my grandparents. Upon looking in the instruction manual it says it can read the following speeds of film:

Daylight ASA 25 45 64 100
Tugnsten ASA 40 64 100 160

I shot some Ektachrome 64T on said camera outdoors. Upon looking around on the internet I have come across some people saying it cannot read 64. I don't know too much about cartridge notches but this camera only has one. Using the notch reader from wikipedia it's 0.5 inches from the center of the gate.

Will it read the Ektachrome 64T as a different film speed thus screwing up my exposure? If so, is there any way the lab can fix it (at least to a degree)?.

Thanks for any input.

-Steven
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 03:02 PM

It says it will already do 64T in the manual, that seems like a good sign, no?
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#3 Steven Kajorinne

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 06:39 PM

It says it will ready 64T in the manual, that seems like a good sign, no?


I thought so when I first shot the film. But what doesn't make sense is how it can detect all those different film speeds with only one cartridge pin. I'm still debating whether or not to get the lab to push it one stop.
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:16 PM

I thought so when I first shot the film. But what doesn't make sense is how it can detect all those different film speeds with only one cartridge pin. I'm still debating whether or not to get the lab to push it one stop.


I think the camera's ASA setting changes depending on how far the pin is pushed in by the cartridge. Or something like that.
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#5 Steven Kajorinne

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:47 PM

I think the camera's ASA setting changes depending on how far the pin is pushed in by the cartridge. Or something like that.


I really don't think that's possible for this camera. There are no variations on the cartridges that will allow the pin to be pushed only a slight ways in. It's either in or it's not. I'm still not understanding why it lists all those film speeds in the manual.

I was playing around with different cartridges of different film speeds and I think it read my 64T as a 40 ASA speed film. I think this because I have an old cartridge of Kodachrome 40 and it presses in the pin. When I pointed it at a scene it gave an exposure of f2. I then popped in my Ektachrome 64T cartridge, it also pressed in the pin and gave the exact same exposure. When I put it my old Ektachrome 160 Type G cartridge it gave an exposure reading of a f4 and a bit, which makes sense to have it around 2 stop+ difference (it removes the filter).

So my film should only be overexposed around a 2/3 of a stop.

Do I have this right? Or is there something wrong in my thinking? Also, will there be much of a problem with my film being overexposed by 2/3 of a stop. How much can the 64T handle? Thanks.
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#6 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 11:32 PM

If you have slightly overexposed your film then it will depend on what you shot. If you shot anything with brighter backgrounds versus the foreground, then its probably a good thing that the camera thought it was 40 ASA.

Assuming that what you shot is very important to you, I would shoot another cartridge in an identical shooting environment in the same way as the first cartridge and make the second cartridge your guinea pig test cartridge. Send the second, "less important" cartridge in first, see how it comes out, then based on that cartridge decide what to do with the first cartridge.

You can have the lab "Pull" film if the film was overexposed while shooting. The pulled film is underdeveloped by the lab, which can help both reduce grain and save shots from mild oxerexposure. If you need to gain more detail out of film that has been underexposed when it was shot, the lab can "push" the film to flush out more detail, but more grain will result.

The lab usually charges an additional fee for either pushing or pulling film and they may do it less often then their normal film processing runs.
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#7 Marc Guerriero

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 01:03 AM

I think that he might be confusing the cartridge alignment pin with the pins for reading the ASA speeds.
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