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New... - A few questions...


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#1 Matthew Prince

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 05:49 PM

Thanks for letting me join. I hope this is the right board for new questions. Right now, I'm working on several treatments that I will work on with a screenwriter next month. However, if I was to reach my goal of running my own independent production company as well as directing I need to know a few things...

1) Why do US movies look more "glossier" than UK ones?

I'd like to know why do US movies always look more colourful or "glossy" than UK movies? I find many UK movies look plain and washed out, almost TV looking, whereas the US movies of all budgets look colourful, well-lit and distinct.

The actors look more attractive & healthy, action is more exciting and camerawork moves and flows more. I know America has been been making movies for over 70 years and have the studio system.

How can we apply those principles in the UK? Do we need better stage-lighting or production values or make-up or simply spend more in post-production? Or is it just bigger budgets?

2) I like night club/night scenes in movies. If you seen the movie "BELLY" starring Nas and DMX, you may remember the stunning night club at the beginning. How did the director create the blue/white lighting effects? It's amazing when you see the blue and white lighting reflecting on the rappers and dancers and their eyes lighting up.

I know that the director was Hype Williams who has done many music videos for the likes of Busta Rhymes, R Kelly & Missy Elliot. I think his DOP was Malik Hassan Sayeed who regularly works with him and Spike Lee.

How were those effects achieved? I would especially appreciate any technical answers, like what equipment and lenses were used.

3) How do directors like Timur Bekmambetov, Michael Bay, Darren Aronofsky achieve such incredible images?

How do they communicate to the set designers, lighting and special effects to achieve exactly what they want? When Michael Bay wanted to do the freeway chase in Bad Boys 2, how would the set designers, lighting and special effects teams know exactly what he wanted?

All answers are appreciated. It may sound like I'm asking much, but I'm fascinating by movies and doing all I can to get involved.



Matthew P :lol:
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#2 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 06:37 PM

3) How do directors like Timur Bekmambetov achieve such incredible images?


Since when Bekamambetov achieve incredible images?
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#3 Matthew Prince

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 05:57 AM

Since when Bekamambetov achieve incredible images?


But look at Night Watch, Day Watch and the trailer for Wanted (2008)
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 11:42 AM

The actors look more attractive & healthy, action is more exciting and camerawork moves and flows more. I know America has been been making movies for over 70 years and have the studio system.

How can we apply those principles in the UK? Do we need better stage-lighting or production values or make-up or simply spend more in post-production? Or is it just bigger budgets?


No, just better weather...

Being a fan of the softer, more natural look of a lot of U.K. cinematography, it's hard for me to see it as a problem. All my early cinematographer heroes were British (Unsworth, Watkin, Young, Morris, Alcott)!

Maybe it's a grass-is-greener phenomenon.

You can find plenty of high-contrast, glossy work in the U.K., especially in commercials. It's just that for narrative work, the general approach has been naturalism, and with your often overcast weather, what looks natural is somewhat soft and somber. Someone growing up in Mexico would have a different sensibility towards light and color.
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rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Technodolly

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine