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Finally have a website


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#1 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 12:52 AM

Spent the weekend seeing "Diva" at the Nuart and Billy Wilder's "The Apartment" on DVD... and creating a website, after much prodding from my agent.

I used a simple program for the Mac called Rapidweaver. Don't have my reel on it yet, but put some frames from my movies on there.

The site looks the worst on Internet Explorer I've noticed, and then best on Safari...

Anyway, check it out:

http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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#2 JK Mohr

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 12:57 AM

Looks good! The only thing I really noticed from an interface standpoint is how large the menu is. It's about twice as tall as it needs to be. I like how simplistic it is though, letting your work speak for itself is a good idea.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:07 AM

Looks good! The only thing I really noticed from an interface standpoint is how large the menu is. It's about twice as tall as it needs to be.


Yes, the downside of a simple program with "theme" pages...
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#4 Hal Smith

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:30 AM

Looks good on my office machine: IE7, XP, 20" CRT monitor.
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#5 Chayse Irvin

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:31 AM

Looks awesome David. I like the simplicity of it and stills look great. When do you think you'll have the reel up?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:38 AM

Looks awesome David. I like the simplicity of it and stills look great. When do you think you'll have the reel up?


I have to recut my reel, it's three years old. The problem is getting clips from the distributors. The bigger the project, the harder it gets.
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#7 JK Mohr

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:41 AM

Yes, the downside of a simple program with "theme" pages...


Haha, yeah. But with that being said, this looks fine for what it is. Good stuff (and your film work is really impressive, by the way)
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#8 John Brawley

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 01:42 AM

I have to recut my reel, it's three years old. The problem is getting clips from the distributors. The bigger the project, the harder it gets.



I usually try to build it into my contract or deal memo that I get a Digibeta or HDCAM SR copy which I pay for myself (depending on the delivery format

That way I get a high quality copy for my reel and they can't complain about the cost. This may be harder to do on a bigger film where the piracy issues are more pressing.

The stills look fabulous David.

jb
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#9 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 02:38 AM

I have to recut my reel, it's three years old. The problem is getting clips from the distributors. The bigger the project, the harder it gets.


You don't need a Reel...


but if it makes you feel better chop it up, throw it on there.


I need to make a site. Good Job David!
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#10 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 02:45 AM

The River Bottom. Wow, it has been a long time!

Site looks great! :)
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#11 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 05:47 AM

That looks great David! I think simpler is usually better for websites. Might take a look at rapidweaver myself.
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#12 Edgar Dubrovskiy

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 07:18 AM

Simple. Informative. Good.

Absolutely loved stills from 'Northfork'.
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#13 Mitch Gross

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 10:00 AM

Very nice.
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#14 Lance Flores

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 11:03 AM

<snip>... and creating a website, after much prodding from my agent.
<snip>
Anyway, check it out:

http://www.davidmullenasc.com


Very nice. Only recommendation is that your agent get a bigger stick.
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#15 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 09:47 PM

"The Sophomore" is showing at Sundance? Nice. Didn't think it would be finished so soon. Time flies!

I noticed "Northfork" is shot all on tungsten film. I've thought this could simplify my own projects, but I don't want the extra glass, and I also worry that I'm losing a filter stage to the 85. I guess you haven't had those issues?

Edited by Jon Rosenbloom, 10 December 2007 - 09:52 PM.

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#16 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 December 2007 - 10:53 PM

Since using ND's outdoors is fairly unavoidable, you can use 85/ND combo filters outdoors. If you want perfect color reproduction it is safer to use the 85, but the truth is that it looks OK without it -- there is some loss of red saturation in the faces and correcting the shot completely back to normal can give it a slightly brown overtone in the shadows. I didn't use the 85 when using the Fuji Eterna 500T indoors in daytime on "The Sophomore" -- it corrected fine in the D.I. suite in my tests.

I generally choose that technique -- no 85 filter -- when I'm planning on a cooler bias anyway to the timing (like on "Northfork" or the first half of "Akeelah and the Bee"). If I were doing a sunny warm desert movie, I'd use the 85 or daylight film to get more red saturation.

"Barry Lyndon", "Excalibur", and "Heat" are examples of movies shot on tungsten stock with no 85 correction in daylight.
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#17 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 12:07 AM

I have to recut my reel, it's three years old. The problem is getting clips from the distributors. The bigger the project, the harder it gets.


Feel free to use shots from "Dark Reprieve."

On a side note, now I know who to contact so I can get an agent, thanks! :D

R,
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#18 Chris Fernando

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 07:28 PM

Not trying to nitpick (honest), but I think you mispelled 'Laurence Fishburne'. Don't know how much that would matter (don't even know how I noticed it, to be honest).

It looks good. Stills/frame grabs look awesome - especially the 'Northfork' stuff. Nice job.
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#19 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 07:36 PM

Not trying to nitpick (honest), but I think you mispelled 'Laurence Fishburne'.


My wife noticed I misspelled Chloe Sevigny...

Easy to fix, thanks.
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#20 Ted Chu

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 12:40 PM

Hi David,

Love both of those movies, watched them a few times. Your web looks good. I prefer not linking spots on a reel but rather keep them as individual pieces, ie., producers don't have much patience. Look at what I created for myself and John Lindley, http://tedchu.com and http://johnlindley.com I used Flash Video MX to convert the spots from DVCAM to flash media.

Ted Chu
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