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#1 Duncan McDougall

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 12:24 PM

Please excuse my lack of experience in asking this question. I am interested in push processing 5218 2 stops to create a look similar to 'Eyes Wide Shut'. (blown out highlights, etc.)

My question is; will a print, pushed 2 stops from a negative that was processed normally, look the same as a print exposed normally from a negative that was pushed 2 stops during processing?

Bad question? One has to learn somehow.

thank you.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 12:26 PM

You don't push the print, only the negative.

And even if a lab allowed you to push a print (their FCP rollers/tanks may not even be set-up for extended times), the grain structure of a print is so small (being only a 5 ASA film stock, maybe?) that pushing isn't going to create the same gritty effect that pushing a 500 ASA color negative stock will.
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#3 Duncan McDougall

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 01:03 PM

That makes sense. Thank you, Mr. Mullen.
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 10:07 AM

You don't push the print, only the negative.

And even if a lab allowed you to push a print (their FCP rollers/tanks may not even be set-up for extended times), the grain structure of a print is so small (being only a 5 ASA film stock, maybe?) that pushing isn't going to create the same gritty effect that pushing a 500 ASA color negative stock will.


This is nit-picking, I know, but I believe print stock may be even lower than 5. It depends on the color temperature (it's natively tungsten-balanced, IIRC) but it dips as low as 3, which is 2/3 of a stop lower than 5-speed film, and * 7 1/3* stops slower than the 500T stock running through a movie camera.

If you pushed print stock, you probably wouldn't like it or it may not even work. There's nowhere near the latitude in print stock that there is in negative film, or even reversal film. Because there aren't several different speed layers or stops of latitude to work with, when you push a print stock, you push everything, highlights, shadows, midtones, so you would probably get more of a fogged look than a gritty look. You may be able to get an interesting look with a higher D-max though. This is all speculation; you want to push your camera negative.
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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 10:12 AM

Please excuse my lack of experience in asking this question. I am interested in push processing 5218 2 stops to create a look similar to 'Eyes Wide Shut'. (blown out highlights, etc.)

My question is; will a print, pushed 2 stops from a negative that was processed normally, look the same as a print exposed normally from a negative that was pushed 2 stops during processing?

Bad question? One has to learn somehow.

thank you.


One mor observation, Eyes Wide Shut, from what I have heard here and read in ASC, opted for the older EXR stocks because Kubrick liked the way they pushed better than the newer Vision stocks. Vision2 may be better or worse for pushing than Vision for the pushed look that Kubrick was after, but just as a word of warning you may need to push more or less to get your look to match EXR films of the time.

Also, Kubrick rated the film at only 1000 or 1250, I forget, with a 2 stop push (to 2000), so he gave more exposure to try to compensate for the loss of shadow detail and contrast buildup you encounter with pushing.
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