Jump to content


Photo

aaton minima


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Christian Tanner

Christian Tanner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  • Student
  • Zurich, London

Posted 12 December 2007 - 10:06 PM

does anyone of you guys know if the shutterangle of the aaton minima can be changed at all?

the tech-specs on the aaton site sais "revolving shutter" - which kind of confused me as kind of every shutter is revolving isn't it?

many thanx in advance!
cary
  • 0

#2 A. Whitehouse

A. Whitehouse
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 267 posts
  • Director
  • Melbourne

Posted 12 December 2007 - 10:16 PM

does anyone of you guys know if the shutterangle of the aaton minima can be changed at all?

the tech-specs on the aaton site sais "revolving shutter" - which kind of confused me as kind of every shutter is revolving isn't it?

many thanx in advance!
cary


My understanding from having worked with the camera is that there are two versions of the shutter (or revisions of the camera). One is fixed at 172.8 and one is fixed at 180. From what i remember one of these revisions is far rarer than the other but I might be entirely wrong. The shutter is fixed (unchangeable) and you would have to look elsewhere for an adjustable shutter S16mm package. This has been discussed before on this site and a search of the forums should produce some results and answers. The A-Minima is a fun camera to use.
  • 0

#3 A. Whitehouse

A. Whitehouse
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 267 posts
  • Director
  • Melbourne

Posted 12 December 2007 - 10:21 PM

This link should help.

http://www.cinematog...=minima shutter

Sasha

Edited by A. Whitehouse, 12 December 2007 - 10:22 PM.

  • 0

#4 John Brawley

John Brawley
  • Sustaining Members
  • 834 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Atlanta Georgia

Posted 12 December 2007 - 11:48 PM

does anyone of you guys know if the shutterangle of the aaton minima can be changed at all?

the tech-specs on the aaton site sais "revolving shutter" - which kind of confused me as kind of every shutter is revolving isn't it?

many thanx in advance!
cary



It's 172.8.

And it's fixed.

(hey..the camera's cheap. Adjustable viewfinder and changeable shutter make it a lot more expensive.)

The revolving shutter is perhaps referring to a secondary shutter attached to the main shutter that allows what aaton called "distant eye viewing"

This means you can take your eye away from the viewfinder while you're rolling and not fog the film.

I was never game enough to try it outside but did a few times indoors and it was fine. With a small monitor, you can actually operate the camera in DV style with the camera out in front of you and then seamlessly put your eye back on the viewfinder.....BRILLIANT !


jb
  • 0

#5 Christian Tanner

Christian Tanner
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  • Student
  • Zurich, London

Posted 13 December 2007 - 07:46 AM

thanx for the help guys.

...and sorry for not beeing able to use the search tool properly it seems :)

shame about the angle though - was planing to use it on a helicopter one take where i follow the artist in and out the chopper. i would have loved to shoot the rotating blades with a closed down shutter angle.

cary
  • 0

#6 Mark Lyon

Mark Lyon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 66 posts
  • Director
  • Solana Beach, CA

Posted 26 December 2007 - 11:24 AM

What about shooting at 48 fps and then taking every other frame in post? If finishing on video/DI, that might be worth a try if you're limited to the A-minima for the shoot.
  • 0

#7 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1675 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 01 January 2008 - 09:58 AM

What about shooting at 48 fps and then taking every other frame in post? If finishing on video/DI, that might be worth a try if you're limited to the A-minima for the shoot.



How is that done in post? Do you do it manually or is there some sort of computer assistance available?

chris
  • 0

#8 Mark Lyon

Mark Lyon
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 66 posts
  • Director
  • Solana Beach, CA

Posted 01 January 2008 - 06:14 PM

If you're finishing in HD at 24fps, you can just put the 48fps-originated shot into the timeline in your editing software and set it to playback at 24fps with no frame blending. It will accomplish this by simply playing every other frame.

If you're working in SD video at 30fps, it's a little trickier--you first would want to remove the 3:2 pulldown to get back to your original 24fps material, then do what I suggested above, then render the result back out to 30fps with pulldown added back in.

I hope this helps--

Mark
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

CineTape

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Opal

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Opal

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc