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stumped by light source


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#1 benjamin aguilar

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 11:27 PM

KITH_frame1_smaller.jpg

Hey everyone,

I have a quick question regarding the lights used in the still picture above, taken from a Kids in the Hall sketch, cinematographer David A. Makin. Does anyone know of a specific light available(brand, model number ect...) to produce this color of light or what it might read in degrees kelvin, or a certain gel that would produce this? I've tried to look for other examples on the web but could not find anything like this(with description) rendered on film. Don't mean to get off subject but David A. Makin's work on KITH is some of the best cinematography i've seen, very natural lighting, almost painting-like especially in the later season's, and one of the best user's of a fog machine IMHO. Anyways, thanks for any input.

Benjamin
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 11:39 PM

Most likely Kinoflos rigged overhead to get that industrial look. Could either be tungsten or daylight tubes used, the only way to really tell is by the practical heatlamps which seem way more orange than heatlamps usually appear to be...so my guess is daylight tubes. But then again who knows, it could have been just available fluorescent light that they corrected in post.

I seriously hope somebody gets me the Kids in the Hall DVD set this Christmas.
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#3 benjamin aguilar

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 11:54 PM

Most likely Kinoflos rigged overhead to get that industrial look. Could either be tungsten or daylight tubes used, the only way to really tell is by the practical heatlamps which seem way more orange than heatlamps usually appear to be...so my guess is daylight tubes. But then again who knows, it could have been just available fluorescent light that they corrected in post.

I seriously hope somebody gets me the Kids in the Hall DVD set this Christmas.


Thanks for the reply Jonathan. That was what I was wondering about, the overly-orange look in the foreground. So you're thinking they could be some practical heatlamps found locally? I was thinking about doing a big test with different practicals but haven't been able to get the funds to do so.
I hope you get a KITH series too. It's great stuff, both comedically and cinematography-wise(film segments).

Anyone else have an idea or two?
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#4 Jess Haas

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 01:54 AM

Looks like heat lamps. They produce a redish light and a lot of heat. You can also find red practical bulbs rather easily, or use theatrical red gels. Add some CTO if you want it more orange.

~Jess
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#5 benjamin aguilar

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 03:03 AM

Looks like heat lamps. They produce a redish light and a lot of heat. You can also find red practical bulbs rather easily, or use theatrical red gels. Add some CTO if you want it more orange.

~Jess



Heat lamps, like for lizards and such?

Benjamin
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#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 03:49 AM

Heat lamps, like for lizards and such?


Those are usually tinted a little blue I believe.

Did a quick google search and found this: http://foodservice.c...b_Each_7258.htm

They also make them clear, but the red ones are typically found at most restaurants.
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#7 Michael Nash

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 04:15 PM

Often used in bathrooms in colder climates. Not an uncommon item.
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#8 benjamin aguilar

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 07:16 PM

Those are usually tinted a little blue I believe.

Did a quick google search and found this: http://foodservice.c...b_Each_7258.htm

They also make them clear, but the red ones are typically found at most restaurants.


Thanks Jonathan. That must be the kind that was used, hopefully. I'm going to order some for sure, at least to test out now that it seems to be in the right direction for the look I'm going for. Might just load up my still camera with some 500T and shoot a test still or two. Thanks guys.
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#9 Hal Smith

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 08:27 PM

Get a Rosco swatchbook and look at the Storaro gel series. Since they were developed by a Cinematographer they work very well with film. Also look at the Cal Color series in the book - they're very clean colors and easy to use. I'd try the Storaro R2001 Red or the Cal Color R4460 CC60 Red first and then maybe the Storaro R2002 Orange. Esthetically I'd probably avoid CTO's - you'd get the exact same effect as 90% of the films that wanted a warm look.

You could use them on any "punchy" light. Pars might make the most sense since they're the same optically as heat lamps. I'd be using Source Four's but that's because I own a pile of them.

http://www.rosco.com...ers/storaro.asp

http://www.rosco.com...eo/calcolor.asp
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#10 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 10:32 PM

Dig the Storaro gels...just have to find more reasons to use'em :)

Also, I should add that the CalColor Red is really close to that deep orange/red of the still at the beginning of this thread.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 14 December 2007 - 10:33 PM.

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#11 Simon Miya

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 11:53 AM

If you had asked this question a month earlier, I would have been able to get you an answer - I finished a show with David in November. Great guy. If I speak to him anytime soon I will direct him to this thread.

It was the coolest thing ever when he informed me that it was his fingers that were "crushing your head"!
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#12 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 12:56 PM

It was the coolest thing ever when he informed me that it was his fingers that were "crushing your head"!


That's awesome. To this day, at any given moment you can catch me crushing people's heads with my fingers.
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#13 benjamin aguilar

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 07:25 PM

If you had asked this question a month earlier, I would have been able to get you an answer - I finished a show with David in November. Great guy. If I speak to him anytime soon I will direct him to this thread.

It was the coolest thing ever when he informed me that it was his fingers that were "crushing your head"!


Hey Simon,

Very nice. What an honor. If you speak to him anytime soon, please direct him straight to me :) How was it to work with him?
I finally got my heatlamps in(last week), and they seem to be the type, although I would have to put a two or three together to concentrate their light more efficiently as they don't give off nearly enough light that I would have liked. Must order some more.

-Benjamin
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#14 Brad Dickson

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 10:32 AM

I was the lighting director for KITH for the video portion in the last two seasons of the show. I didn't work on the film sections but a co worker was the gaffer on the show. Looking at the picture it doesn't look like any of our in house sets or props from the time so I assume it was a location at an actual restaraunt therefore real infrared heat lamps. The hot spot reflection in the silver looks like a filament of an RFL spot infra red lamp.
I know you already went the heat lamp route so you should obtain a similar look.
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#15 benjamin aguilar

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Posted 27 February 2008 - 08:03 PM

Get a Rosco swatchbook and look at the Storaro gel series. Since they were developed by a Cinematographer they work very well with film. Also look at the Cal Color series in the book - they're very clean colors and easy to use. I'd try the Storaro R2001 Red or the Cal Color R4460 CC60 Red first and then maybe the Storaro R2002 Orange. Esthetically I'd probably avoid CTO's - you'd get the exact same effect as 90% of the films that wanted a warm look.

You could use them on any "punchy" light. Pars might make the most sense since they're the same optically as heat lamps. I'd be using Source Four's but that's because I own a pile of them.

http://www.rosco.com...ers/storaro.asp

http://www.rosco.com...eo/calcolor.asp


Thanks for that Hal. I purchased the Cal Color 90 Red today and did a quick test. It turned out well and is better than the heat lamps that I had purchased. I took a look at the Storaro Red but did feel it was quite what I wanted. I will be doing some more in-depth tests with the Cal Color sometime soon as well.

-Benjamin
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Wooden Camera

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Visual Products

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