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#1 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 02:39 AM

I just saw this tonight. What a great movie! Great script, great acting, great directing, and great cinematography that supported the story very nicely. This is by far the most original film I've seen all year.
Congrats to Eric Steelberg!
I may have to see it again and pay better attention to the cinematography, as well as to hear all the lines I missed because the audience was laughing so hard from the line before.
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#2 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 05:51 AM

Beat me to it Brad. Elhanan and I saw the film the other night. It was excellent, looked great Eric, congratulations. Plus the film was great, a lot of fun, congrats on being a part of the project!
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#3 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 11:32 AM

Thanks guys! It's been quite a ride with all the reviews and now the Golden Globe noms. I'm trying to find out where it's showing digitally...I saw it at the Arclight Hollywood last week and the projection was actually too bright.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 11:55 AM

It's a great movie, and looks great too.

I saw it at the Landmark, which oddly enough, had a projection problem - the bottom of the screen kept drifting out of focus slightly, which screwed up the final pullback in the movie because the two main characters went soft as the camera pulled back.
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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:09 PM

It's a great movie, and looks great too.

I saw it at the Landmark, which oddly enough, had a projection problem - the bottom of the screen kept drifting out of focus slightly, which screwed up the final pullback in the movie because the two main characters went soft as the camera pulled back.


Storm up to the projection room, whip out your ASC member card, and ask for your money back (not that a projectionist would even know what The ASC is)? ;)
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#6 John Holland

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:20 PM

This a bit off subject [ Juno not here yet] its just seems you have more bad projection problems in the US then we do here ,although everything follows through a few years later to here , i remember seeing a Peter Jackson horror movie name i dont recall Micheal J . Fox was the lead anyway watched this film in a multiplex in Colorado Springs . It was 2.40 format most of which was not on the screen but on the right hand side of the wall of the cinema . Tried to complain but was told your the "only one ."
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:37 PM

It's hard for a projectionist to easily and quickly fix it when the problem is that the film is not flat in the projector gate. That could be a mechanical problem that needs fixing later, or the gate has to be pulled and cleaned out, etc.
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#8 John Holland

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 12:54 PM

Yes i do know the mechanics just worried me that no else in the audience cared !
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#9 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 01:52 PM

Saw it in the new Arclight in Sherman Oaks, was pretty good projection and sound.
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#10 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 04:53 PM

When I was screening a print at Deluxe the right side of the screen was soft so I'm not surprised. I ran into David at the Kodak Vision 3 thing and we were recounting bad projection stories...amazing how common it is.

I can't stand film projection. So inconsistent. For all the drawbacks digital has, you gain so much more in other areas.
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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 06:07 PM

I can't stand film projection. So inconsistent. For all the drawbacks digital has, you gain so much more in other areas.


Though I suspect that when there are just as many digital projectors as there are film ones, and they start to age and drift in tolerances, the law of averages will catch up and we'll see all sorts of new problems - and a few classic ones!
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#12 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 02:39 PM

I saw it at the Grove and the projection was fine.
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#13 Bill Totolo

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 04:55 AM

Just caught it at The Landmark. Congrats, Eric on a great job.
I'd love to have an animated credit like that some day.
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#14 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 09:09 PM

They start rolling out to digital screens this Friday, unfortunately none in the LA area. But there will be digital screens in Chicago, NYC, Phily, DC, most major cities.

I poked my head into a screening yesterday at the Sherman Oaks Arclight and it looked pretty good.
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#15 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 11:29 PM

Saw this tonight (with some fellow Cine.com users, no less) and truly loved the film. Beautifully shot, Eric. The cinematography was perfectly in balance with the story and direction. I was also a fan of the creative opening credit sequence (same design firm that did "Thank You for Smoking" I believe?). Was that entire sequence taken from live action (shot with backgrounds), or was green screen involved?

I saw it at the Landmark, which oddly enough, had a projection problem - the bottom of the screen kept drifting out of focus slightly, which screwed up the final pullback in the movie because the two main characters went soft as the camera pulled back.


I noticed this final "soft shot" too, but assumed it was intentional, as the tree towards the end of the move seemed sharper than the actors. It seemed to fit the story to me -- a happy accident maybe?
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#16 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 19 December 2007 - 12:57 PM

Saw this tonight (with some fellow Cine.com users, no less) and truly loved the film. Beautifully shot, Eric. The cinematography was perfectly in balance with the story and direction. I was also a fan of the creative opening credit sequence (same design firm that did "Thank You for Smoking" I believe?). Was that entire sequence taken from live action (shot with backgrounds), or was green screen involved?


Thank you Rory, that is the best kind of compliment. I try to remember that what I do is for the story, not my reel. That being said, I think there is a real beauty and discipline in trying to be transparent and lo-fi.

Yes, the opening was done by the same company, Shadowplay Studios. It was pretty incredible how they did it. They took digital stills of neighborhoods, then videotaped Ellen Page on a treadmill in our production offices against the white walls. Once done, they printed frames out on paper, then Xeroxed a few times over, then hand colored them. They cut her out and placed it on the backgrounds. They did that whole process many many times, and it took them right up until the very last minute. I absolutedly love what they did. I had them send me a still from my credit and it's beautiful.
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#17 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 08:57 AM

Very cool, thanks Eric!
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#18 Daniel Katz

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Posted 22 December 2007 - 02:05 AM

Just saw this for the second time at BAM with my girlfriend. I would like to continue the congratulatory sentiments that have been displayed for Juno and its cinematographer Eric Steelberg. Very Unselfish cinematography which in my mind equates to good cinematography.

On a technichal note, having seen it twice, I am curious about the last shot which trucks out as Juno and Paulie play a duet at the steps of his house. The first time I saw it I thought it was a problem with projection but on a second viewing it was still soft on the characters for the entire shot. Was this a deliberate choice or was the shot only executed once and discovered soft all too late. It really doesn't efffect the shot and as another poster said it "works" and maybe it was a happy accident.

Once again, congratulations on a fine job and a exceptional contribution to a wonderful film.
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#19 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 04:42 PM

Just saw this for the second time at BAM with my girlfriend. I would like to continue the congratulatory sentiments that have been displayed for Juno and its cinematographer Eric Steelberg. Very Unselfish cinematography which in my mind equates to good cinematography.

On a technichal note, having seen it twice, I am curious about the last shot which trucks out as Juno and Paulie play a duet at the steps of his house. The first time I saw it I thought it was a problem with projection but on a second viewing it was still soft on the characters for the entire shot. Was this a deliberate choice or was the shot only executed once and discovered soft all too late. It really doesn't efffect the shot and as another poster said it "works" and maybe it was a happy accident.

Once again, congratulations on a fine job and a exceptional contribution to a wonderful film.


Juno and Paullie are actually quite sharp in that shot. What you're seeing is a loss in resolution of the original due to the nature of a release print and the fact that they get so small in frame...the print just cant resolve enough detail to make them appear sharp. It was shot at the wide end of an 11-1, probably at about a 5.6-8 on 5205...so even if the AC was a few feet off (wasn't) they'd still be tack sharp.

Thanks for the note about the 'unselfishness.' What is BAM?
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#20 Robert Skates

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 06:02 PM

Eric,
I saw JUNO yesterday. Very nice work. I have a question. Very early in the film the film there is a shot of Juno walking up to her house. The color saturation is very rich. The greed and red of the foliage and the light blue color of the house really pop. Were you using an Enhancing filter for the shot.

I hope you don't mind all these "how did you do..." questions. Your work as well as David Mullen's are an inspiration to all of us on this forum. I do not think we say it enough, thanks for sharing the details of your work and experience with us.
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