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Blown Out Windows


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#1 Timothy David Orme

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 03:46 PM

I'm going to warn you, this may be a dumb question.

Every time I shoot something on miniDV, or even when I'm working on beta, there seems to be no way to get the windows from being so blown out. I just don't have that much light to put inside.

What are some ways of counteracting this, or dealling with it. I've heard of people 'treating' the windows somehow. What does that consist of?

Thanks,

Tim.
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#2 Phil Bradshaw

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 04:59 PM

I'm going to warn you, this may be a dumb question.

Every time I shoot something on miniDV, or even when I'm working on beta, there seems to be no way to get the windows from being so blown out. I just don't have that much light to put inside.

What are some ways of counteracting this, or dealling with it. I've heard of people 'treating' the windows somehow. What does that consist of?

Thanks,

Tim.


"Treating" can consist of several options to affect the light spilling within the window. Some common methods of treating windows are to use ND gels on the inside or outside of the window (depending on how much detail you will see), or to stretch a net on a frame or simply rig a 4x4 or 2x3 net on a stand outside of the window. If you don't have the luxury of these tools, see if you can use shears or adjust the existing blind to a level that's tolerable.
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 05:02 PM

You can put ND (Neutral Density) gel on windows to cut down light transmission. It is available in different densities, where every .3 equals a one stop reduction of light. You might start off with ND.6 (two stop reduction).

I'm going to take this opportunity to clarify once again, that "latitude" does not refer to the range of brightness an imaging system can capture. Latitude is the amount an image can be over- or under-exposed and corrected back to normal brightness with acceptable results.
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#4 Jess Haas

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 05:43 PM

If using nets they can look a little funky if they are in focus. Just something to keep in mind when deciding which to use.

~Jess
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#5 Timothy David Orme

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 12:12 PM

Great. I thought those were some of the ways of working around/through it, but I wanted to clarify.

Also, I didn't know that's what latitude meant, so thanks for that information also.
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