Jump to content


Photo

Doing DI...need guidance


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Rajavel Olhiveeran

Rajavel Olhiveeran
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • India

Posted 19 December 2007 - 02:10 AM

dear all
am gonna be doing my next feature....on super 35 (my debut in super 35)....and so hence would be doing a DI for the film. the final projection gona be on film. will be doing a 2K scanning. though it is a powerful tool in the present day filmmaking......i would like to make the best use of it.
>>how do i plan for the best output....what all ways in which i could preplan in my production stages to get a phenomenal output from the DI......

>>the more i know about the features and the possibilites of the tool can i use it properly.....where do i get that kind of knowlege from..websites..articles...examples. (wouldnt be able to get time to learn sitting with the equipment)

>>becos i am going to DI..does it mean i dont need to use camera filters to get closer to the look i want. will i be spoiling the negative if i try using filters. but i figured out that ....in need of a cool look i shot tungsten stock 5217 without 85 filter....and also tried with filter. in the telecine i gOt the rich cool look with the sample wihtout 85. the sample with filter was flattening the imagewhen i tried adding blue in the post. so how do i tackle this.
WILL IT BE THE SAME PROBLEM WITH DOING DI. should i get a clean negative and try everything in post?

>>becos anyway i am doing a DI...does it make economical sense for me to go for kodak Vision 1 series (cheaper than Vision 2). 5274/5278 than 5217/5218. how much of this stock selection will affect my output in the DI.
thanks
rajavel
  • 0

#2 Chris Burke

Chris Burke
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1675 posts
  • Boston, MA

Posted 19 December 2007 - 04:25 PM

I would think that it make best sense to get as close to the look you want on set, on the negative. To make the most of your DI, less is best. If you have to or want to manipulate the negative during the DI, it is going to show and cost you. Is your project FX heavy? If so, the same applies, get the look in camera first, then augment it in post.

If you want to save money on stock, you might look at the Fuji Eterna 500T. The Golden Compass was shot on it and put through a 2k DI, as a visual reference.
  • 0

#3 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 20 December 2007 - 10:24 AM

The general consensus around here often is: Every DP likes to impact the negative artistically. Yet, DI/digital post provides so much control that the tendency now is to get the best and cleanest information on the negative (ungoofed with). That allows the post guys the greatest possibilities for control and artistic decisions at their stage. Yea, it kind of takes some of the artistic control out of the DP's hands and puts it into some dark room, digi-troll's hands but it does serve the production's potentials much better.
  • 0

#4 Werner Van Peppen

Werner Van Peppen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • Gaffer
  • London, UK

Posted 25 December 2007 - 12:15 PM

I'd shoot any plates and or shots which require effects work clean. That way you can add the effects/filers overall alter on and they will be more consistent
It is best to get a balanced negative to the DI stage, which gives you maximum latitude to play with . Bear in mind DI is a tool and cannot rescue everything so a good neg is important. That said if you know that you want a specific look then go for it. Just be aware what impact it will have later on.

I'd go and talk to the D.I. facility and get a feel for what they require and can do (is it their first D.I.?). The more you know the more you can anticipate problems. Speak to the colorist/DI facility manager about what you are trying to achieve.

Good luck

Werner Van Peppen
systems Engineer, Quantel
  • 0


Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Opal

Abel Cine

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Opal

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post