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Winter Shoot


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#1 Loni Petrowski

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 03:00 PM

Hi there, I am rather new to the filming industry and am working on a film for 2008.

I have a few winter scenes to shoot and am wondering if I can shoot them with my Canon XL2? The camera is rated for 0 to 40C. The scenes will be done on days where the temp will reach -7C to -5C. Is there a problem? I know I have to watch going into a warm location after being outside, but will the camera work outside for a two hour shoot?

Thanks, Loni
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#2 Walter Graff

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 05:04 PM

You should be fine Loni. You may want to fashion a blanket around the camera if you are concerned about the elements but this will not really do much of anything in particular. Keep the tape door of the side covered more than anything Do not bring the camera in and out of cold and warm or you risk head problems and lens problems due to condensation. Simply take it out from room temperature, wait five minutes and go. Load your tape before you go out. Also when done. Take the tape out and put it in your jacket pocket in the cold air, then when you go inside, do not use the tape for at least an hour. Also do not use the camera until it feels like it has returned to room temperature. This way if any condensation does decide to form, it will have long since dissipated.
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#3 John-Erling Holmenes Fredriksen

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 05:12 PM

I don't have any experience with that specific camera, but I know that local TV and high schools in Northern Norway use that type of equipment outdoors all the time, at temperatures that low, and at extremes even lower.

There are some small plastic bags you can get at sports shops to put into your mittens, that will heat up and stay heated for an entire day once opened. We've tried to use them on the Pro35 adapter when shooting outside in the cold, not with great effect, but I guess you could try to attach them to your camera to keep it warm. Our experience was that they didn't seem to keep as warm when attached to our equipment, as they would when held in our hands.

Hope this helps.
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#4 Loni Petrowski

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Posted 23 December 2007 - 06:39 PM

I will try to make some sort of blanket to fit the camera. To keep it protected more than anything. Thanks for the advice! :D
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