Jump to content


Photo

night exteriors shooting on s16mm


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Vincenzo Condorelli AIC

Vincenzo Condorelli AIC
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 25 December 2007 - 12:08 AM

hi everybody,

i'm in india to shoot a graduation short film in s16mm, which is going to be mostly night interiors & exteriors. the project has the ambition of mixing together the noir genre and the indian tradition. in terms of lighting my main references are the classic hollywood cameramen who created the noir genre (alton, toland, krasker, howe and so on). but as we are going to shoot in color (my choice is the 7218 500T for most of the sequences and the 100T for two green screen shots) therefore i'm still not sure to which extent i'm going to emulate that hard lighting style of such classics.

at the moment my main concern regards a number of very wide night exterior set-ups which will recreate the look of an industrial city during the economic depression. the location in which we will be shooting is a huge abandonded industrial area, with a factory compound and a few buildings arounds, with lots of narrow alleys and interesting corners. but the place is now abandoned so there's no street lights at all (we might add some lamp posts).

the widest shots i have to set up are probably going to be 150 ft wide (including a 4 floor building) in this respect i considered two options for my ambient light:

- dino lights with 1/4 or 1/2 ctb
- a big diffusion frame held by scaffolding on the two sides to diffuse a variable number of 1ks with 1/4 or 1/2 ctb.

i can't have any dino lights bgger than 12k but i could customise my diffusion frame (up to 1K x 36). the problem is that i'm not sure whether i'll have the chance of testing this set-up before the shooting so i dont want to end up with less lighting power than i need. according to your experience, how muxh power you reckon i'll need to light evenly a 150ft width shot? could 1 dino 12k be enough or i need more? would i get a more even lit "moonlight" out of a 12K or 24k diffusion frame?

thank you all for your advice.
  • 0

#2 Kiarash Sadigh

Kiarash Sadigh
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 100 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 25 December 2007 - 07:14 PM

I would use the 12k dino as "moonlight" ambient light. It certainly gives you more freedom when it comes to pan/tilting your source comparing to a bunch of small lights going through a big diffusion material. To get more of an evenly-lit night look you may want to try shooting your lights up at a 20by silver on a scafold/crane....this is achived by building a black box around your source on the ground using solid floppies (to kill the spil) and pointing your lights up at your bounce material.
Film noir style is however a bit different from this imho. Toland would've gone with harder look to invite more contrast into the shot. Your 7218 can handle a lot of information in the blacks, good luck.
  • 0

#3 Vincenzo Condorelli AIC

Vincenzo Condorelli AIC
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 December 2007 - 06:43 AM

I would use the 12k dino as "moonlight" ambient light. It certainly gives you more freedom when it comes to pan/tilting your source comparing to a bunch of small lights going through a big diffusion material. To get more of an evenly-lit night look you may want to try shooting your lights up at a 20by silver on a scafold/crane....this is achived by building a black box around your source on the ground using solid floppies (to kill the spil) and pointing your lights up at your bounce material.
Film noir style is however a bit different from this imho. Toland would've gone with harder look to invite more contrast into the shot. Your 7218 can handle a lot of information in the blacks, good luck.


for what i've seen so far grips in this country are amazing they can set up and move around huge frames really really fast...however i think you're right in pointing out that a dino would be much more handful. regarding the look, i'd definitely add on this soft ambient light hard directional lights (5k or 12k) white balanced trying to cast hard shadows on the walls. in this respect, i've seen that in many of those classc noirs they would place the light right behind a corner but towards camera, having the actors running towards them and generating long shadows. i'd like to reply this look.
  • 0


Abel Cine

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

The Slider

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Glidecam

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport