Jump to content


Photo

Digital Film Archiving


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Tenolian Bell

Tenolian Bell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 907 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Brooklyn, NY

Posted 27 December 2007 - 02:39 PM

New York Times: The Afterlife Is Expensive for Digital Movies

Having figured out that really big money comes from reselling old films — on broadcast television, then cable, videocassettes, DVDs, and so on — companies like Warner Brothers and Paramount Pictures for decades have been tucking their 35-millimeter film masters and associated source material into archives, some of which are housed in a Kansas salt mine, or in limestone mines in Kansas and Pennsylvania.

At present, a copy of virtually all studio movies — even those like “Click” or “Miami Vice” that are shot using digital processes — is being stored in film format, protecting the finished product for 100 years or more.

To store a digital master record of a movie costs about $12,514 a year, versus the $1,059 it costs to keep a conventional film master. Much worse, to keep the enormous swarm of data produced when a picture is “born digital” — that is, produced using all-electronic processes, rather than relying wholly or partially on film — pushes the cost of preservation to $208,569 a year, vastly higher than the $486 it costs to toss the equivalent camera negatives, audio recordings, on-set photographs and annotated scripts of an all-film production into the cold-storage vault.

To begin with, the hardware and storage media — magnetic tapes, disks, whatever — on which a film is encoded are much less enduring than good old film. If not operated occasionally, a hard drive will freeze up in as little as two years. Similarly, DVDs tend to degrade: according to the report, only half of a collection of disks can be expected to last for 15 years, not a reassuring prospect to those who think about centuries. Digital audiotape, it was discovered, tends to hit a “brick wall” when it degrades. While conventional tape becomes scratchy, the digital variety becomes unreadable.

  • 0

#2 Jason Debus

Jason Debus
  • Sustaining Members
  • 311 posts
  • Student
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 27 December 2007 - 04:06 PM

The article is being discussed here:

NY Times article on digital storage
  • 0

#3 Tenolian Bell

Tenolian Bell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 907 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Brooklyn, NY

Posted 27 December 2007 - 04:44 PM

OK thanks I'm late to the party.
  • 0


The Slider

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Opal

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Visual Products

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly