Jump to content


Photo

Emerson college


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Kevin Mastman

Kevin Mastman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Student

Posted 28 December 2007 - 12:30 PM

hello

I am a film major at Emerson college. They tell us at Emerson that our school has a great reputation in the business and Emerson grads tend to have an edge. I was wondering from the cinematographers that have been working for a while if you have found this to be a true statement. Have you ever heard of Emerson and have you found that its graduates are worthy of hiring?

If there are any Emerson grads out there that are currently working,or aren't, please tell me your story. I am interested in knowing what I'm in for. This applies to people who didnt go to Emerson as well.

If there are any current Emerson students reading this, sup?

Kevin
  • 0

#2 Joe Taylor

Joe Taylor
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 397 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 December 2007 - 09:50 AM

hello

I am a film major at Emerson college. They tell us at Emerson that our school has a great reputation in the business and Emerson grads tend to have an edge. I was wondering from the cinematographers that have been working for a while if you have found this to be a true statement. Have you ever heard of Emerson and have you found that its graduates are worthy of hiring?

If there are any Emerson grads out there that are currently working,or aren't, please tell me your story. I am interested in knowing what I'm in for. This applies to people who didnt go to Emerson as well.

If there are any current Emerson students reading this, sup?

Kevin



Hey Kevin,

I've known Jean Stawarz for about 12 years. She's about as good of a screenwriting professor as you'll ever meet. Take her classes and you're in good hands.
  • 0

#3 Alexander Disenhof

Alexander Disenhof
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 86 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 29 December 2007 - 11:28 AM

Whats up Kevin? Thats a good question. It seems like it doesn't really matter what school you go to, but who you meet there and how much you personally can get out of the experience, both in experience on film shoots and networking with people. Hope your break is going well and I'm sure we will see each other on set soon!
  • 0

#4 Michael Most

Michael Most
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 765 posts
  • Other

Posted 29 December 2007 - 04:01 PM

I am a film major at Emerson college. They tell us at Emerson that our school has a great reputation in the business and Emerson grads tend to have an edge.


Emerson does have a good reputation and a number of alumni in the industry - primarily producers, in my experience. Having said that, no college or any degree programs give you "an edge." The only thing that gives you that is demonstrated talent. This is just as true for USC or NYU graduates as it is for Emerson.

If you are interested in an internship, though, those producer alumni are worth contacting, as they do tend to keep in touch with the school and like to offer internships to its students.
  • 0

#5 Walter Graff

Walter Graff
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1334 posts
  • Other
  • New York City

Posted 30 December 2007 - 12:42 AM

Emerson does have quite a few graduates in the industry in various positions. But... so do most of the top 100 liberal arts colleges. Here is something you will learn out of school. It's great, but it has little to do with the outside working world in most cases. Yea, schools pride themselves on their graduates. They should. Nothing wrong with it. But... Talent doesn't come from school but from those that graduate and make something of themselves. While some schools seem to have a knack for teaching the right organizational skills, or what Peter Senge called in his famous book "The Fifth Discipline", but in general I can find ten people in well heeled positions in this industry that came from Ivy League schools. And I can find just as many who came from lesser schools. Visit Linkin.com and look up the listings of pros from Emerson and then pick any other top rated school and you'll find just as many came from those too. Don't concentrate too much on school. Rather concentrate on making as many connections as you can. It is so tough to make it in this business (TV, Film, Media). There are thousands and thousands of people all trying for a few hundred jobs. Unless the HR person has an affinity for a particular school, it's the least important part of the equation, and to most HR people, just a checkmark that you completed the test. They want to know what organization skills you have, and what effort you seem to be making to make your mark, and if you have made any headroom. After that, it is all about you and your personality if you are given the chance for that interview. Most graduates have nothing on their resume but college "station/production" experience. To an HR person, that means little, so they next look at what responsibility you have been given if any, what school/how smart you seem to be. If you pass those mix and match hurdles, it comes back to that interview. Now if you know a name? That is a pass to take two steps past someone that just has a resume. Work for free if you have to, but make sure you have real world experience on that resume when you get out of school and you will have one more check mark than someone that says "cameraman at college station". I started by going to a newly opened studio in Queens NY in the early eighties called Silvercup Studios. I simply said I wanted to work for free. They said okay, come in every day. I did. I made connections. I had great mentors like a guy named Norman Leigh. My talent was noticed and I was working on major commercials and features and built a foundation to move forward. By the time I was 26 I had more experience in more field of both film and video than most have in an entire career. You've got to do whatever you can to get real world experience as fast as possible. That means some "organized" production company or entity that will be recognized as such. If it to be a cinematographer, you have to shoot whatever you can and build a reel and build an eye. You get better the more you shoot and your reel will show that as you find better projects that you get better at doing. And along the way meet as many people as possible and make sure to keep in touch, follow up and give them a reason to remember you, or find something that will make them remember you next time you meet them, like some like they have, or some funny story about their life. Keep notes on the back of their business card about anything that could trigger them to remember you next time you have a chance to see them again or call. Calling someone and saying "I met you at that shoot" is far less effective in putting a foot in the door than "I met you at that shoot where the camera almost fell and I grabbed it for you. Remember me?"
  • 0

#6 Jess Dunlap

Jess Dunlap
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Boston, MA

Posted 08 January 2008 - 04:45 PM

Hey Kevin (and Alex),

Check out the back of this month's American Cinematographer! (The "There Will Be Blood" issue).

Represent.

-Jess Dunlap (Emerson College)
  • 0


Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

CineTape

Visual Products

Opal

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

The Slider

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery