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Where to start for second year cinematographer?


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#1 Rainer Halbich

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 02:52 PM

I am a second year cinematography student is South Africa, My studies costs around 43 000rand per year ( +- 4 000$) and I still have 3 years to go. I don't know if you know anything about South-African film making, but overall it's the biggest disaster since 9/11, THIS IS MY PROBLEM!, I am one of the top students @ my college and some of my films was in the top ten, and still it looks like a Zimbabwe production because of other crew members. My college claims that I can use my short films in my CV, but what is the use of showing off my short film productions if thy are all crap?

This is my solution, and I want you (the reader) to tell me what you think:
I am looking for a good secondhand camera like a Canon XL2 to start a part time job as a cinematographer, the idea is to make a name for myself and some money to help with the massive 43 000 rand that I have to pay every year for my studies.

What is a good aria to start on?
Live events
Private videos like funerals
Spy work
SOMEONE HELP ME! Please.

Is the Canon XL2 a good camera to start with?
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#2 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 03:13 PM

Welcome to the club. You are going to have to be very flexible and resilient, for this is a tough business no matter where you are. Just do any kind of video job that comes your way until you have a body of work in the video field that you want to pursue. The XL2 is a good camera. Good luck. ;)
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#3 Rory Hanrahan

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 03:15 PM

With all due respect to your current education situation?

Publicly dissing your crew -- with or without naming them -- is not the most mature behavior. Even if some wayward tech f*ed something up big time, you really need to be able to internalize that and learn not to blame others for your shortcomings. If I ever heard a working Cinematographer make that claim? well, I wouldn't be knocking down his/her door to work with them in the future.

School is the place to make these mistakes, best of luck with all of them.



Also, there are countless discussions on this site in the proper forums dealing with cinematography education and information about the camera you are asking about. In the future, I suggest looking up your topic before posting.
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#4 Rainer Halbich

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 06:41 PM

With all due respect to your current education situation?

Publicly dissing your crew -- with or without naming them -- is not the most mature behavior. Even if some wayward tech f*ed something up big time, you really need to be able to internalize that and learn not to blame others for your shortcomings. If I ever heard a working Cinematographer make that claim? well, I wouldn't be knocking down his/her door to work with them in the future.

School is the place to make these mistakes, best of luck with all of them.



Also, there are countless discussions on this site in the proper forums dealing with cinematography education and information about the camera you are asking about. In the future, I suggest looking up your topic before posting.



Tanx for the tip, learn something new every day. I don't think that you know how bad my college really are, but it's very true that I have to keep my comments to my self, a true cinematographer admits when he makes a mistake. I am sorry.
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#5 Mike Williamson

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 08:18 PM

Part of the cinematographer's job is to find ways to get what you need before you get to set, so that you've put yourself in a position to succeed. If you're not happy with the level of experience of your crew, then you should talk to your producer and director and help them understand your need for more experienced people and why you're going to have to pay for better crew members. Or figure out how to change your lighting, camera moves, etc. so that your crew can make them work well.

At the end of the day, it's your responsibility to make it work. As one of my professors used to say, don't think that a good excuse is a substitute for getting results.
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