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#1 michael rand

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 05:51 PM

any advice on this interview setup would be much appreciated.

-11am (sun will be hitting the buildings similar to picture attached)
-1 camera tight; 1 camera wide
-subject will be 10 feet from the window
-the window is merely an opening- no glass!
-format is minidv, p+S &primes

my plan is to use a double net on a 20X frame or simply use the double secured to the concrete columns with no frame. i'll have access to a double net and a single (but have never combined these before....moree' effect?)

will key with daylite balanced kinoflos or a 2K with 1/2 blue (medium chimera) very close to subject.

my main concern is the blown out background. client wants to be able to see buildings in BG

thanks for the advice
Michael
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 06:43 PM

Maybe some bounce board to try to scoop in extra light from off screen (bounce one into the other?) as to not have to worry about more power. Really about all I can think of unless you can somehow get more lights up there. But from your still you're not in too bad of shape, really, if you get your other lights in close (through some careful framing out on the wide shot)
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 09:41 PM

You're going to need bigger lights. Kinos against sunlight are basically pi$$ing in the wind I'm afraid, and a gelled 2K won't give a whole lot either if you're planning on diffusing it.

You're talking about a difference of probably 5 stops between foreground and background, and video can generally only handle about 1-1/2 stops overexposure before it clips. A double will only drop the BG one stop; adding a single will likely create moire. You might try sharkstooth scrim or Roscoscrim.

I've done setups like this before on video using a 1200 HMI bounced into foamcore as a key, and then other units (whatever's available) for fill.

I've also done interviews like this using an ND grad turned sideways, to try to hold a little more detail in otherwise bright background.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 10:07 PM

Yes, I agree, you need bigger lights, HMI's. Or shoot tight and put a big acrylic ND sheet behind the subject's head...

Or pray for an overcast day.
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#5 michael rand

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 08:31 AM

ok you guys have convinced me. I guess I needed a little nudging :)

so I'll still use a net (double only). I have a medium chimera (with the lightest chimera front diffusion) that I'll put a 1200HMI in.

par or open face HMI through the chimera?

I also have a 4X4 frame I could shoot the HMI through (1/4 diffusion?)

I know this is now getting nitpicky, just curious what your preferences would be.

thanks for setting me straight.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 02:30 PM

I'd go for the 1200 par through a frame of diffusion (have several diffusions on hand; Opal, 250, 216). This will give you the most flexibility.

You can always go with a bigger unit, but 1200's run easily off house power. Maybe get two. ;)
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 02:44 PM

I'd try for 2 1200s or a 1200 and a 575. 1200 to key through a 4x of something. I'm kind of fond of 250. I prefer frames to chimeras because you can skin them with whatever you want. The other 1200 or 575 can make a nice edge and maybe be bounced back in for fill. Something like that. Interviews are kind of fun once in a while, to just light people with no concern of motivation or continuity, etc.
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#8 Brad Dickson

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 04:15 PM

I would suggest you investigate Roscoview as a possible solution to your windows. http://www.rosco.com.....ew 2_0001.wmv
The video (windows media player needed) link shows its effect on a window. Polarizing film for the window , polarizing filter on the camera. Just a note it is not cheap. Contact Tom Schwartz of Rosco Canada about this product. http://www.rosco.com...ctory/index.asp
I have samples of this product and it works.
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#9 Michael Nash

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 10:29 PM

I would suggest you investigate Roscoview as a possible solution to your windows.


If he HAD a window he could just use ND... ;)

"-the window is merely an opening- no glass!"

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#10 Brad Dickson

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 06:18 AM

If he HAD a window he could just use ND... ;)

"-the window is merely an opening- no glass!"

I have used ND in an opening with no glass by simply creating a wooden frame for it and butting the gel side by side and joining it. I have also gone with scrim over ND to get a good light reduction with reduced light reflection due to the scrim being in front of the gel. However since there would be variable daylight conditions he woudn't know the level of ND until day of the shoot. The benefit of the Roscoview is that it is variable and can be adjusted by simply rotating the camera's polarizing filter.
Yes the option of going to HMI and increasing the interior light level is valid but if increasing the light level is not an option due to power limitations, heat, guests personal preference, higher levels causing sqinting, then light reduction maybe an option.
Doubling a net would not be good as it would give a "moree' effect" as he noted. However theatrical scrim (such as black shark's tooth scrim)could be an option since it is more dense than netting and would not be reflective. Just a suggestion in regards to reduction methods but as others have noted increasing light levels is an option also.
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#11 Chris Clarke

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 11:41 AM

Having a polarizer on the camera would necessitate more light on the subject due to the stop loss, wouldn't it?
I'm not sure whether this would outweigh the benefits of the Roscoview?
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#12 Chris Pritzlaff

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 07:53 PM

Doubling a net would not be good as it would give a "moree' effect" as he noted.


Can you explain what you mean by moree effect?
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#13 Michael Nash

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 08:43 PM

Having a polarizer on the camera would necessitate more light on the subject due to the stop loss, wouldn't it?


No, it would just require a wider aperture.
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#14 Michael Nash

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Posted 23 January 2008 - 08:44 PM

Can you explain what you mean by moree effect?


Moire: http://en.wikipedia..../Moiré_pattern
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#15 Brad Dickson

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 12:47 AM

As you are shooting video you could go completely different if you will be editing this item and have keying capabilities in your NLE software. Why not position your cameras before the interview and roll on a properly exposed background then reset your cameras inside as per your setup with your guest lit against a keyable background. You may even be able to have the sunlight be your subjects light source if you have the "non window" opening to your back. No extra lights just a keyable background setup.
I know the look will depend upon the quality of your software and it is a "cheat" but maybe your client will accept it.
Others have noted some background light reduction in combination with raising light levels and I agree they offer valid options. Just offering alternate ideas.
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#16 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 11:21 AM

Add one more for renting a couple of 1200 hmi's. In combination with your double net I think you will be in the ballpark. Shame its mini-dv, but what can you do, right? Like Michael said, kinos will get you NOWHERE outside.

I fancy 250 but diffuse to taste! :-) Bring some white cards.
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