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Using 35mm adapter -- advice?


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#1 Steve Nayhi

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 01:58 AM

Hey guys,

I'm about to start production on a music video next week, and I'll be shooting on an HVX with the Redrock adapter and a set of Canon prime lenses. Basically, I would like to know what advice any of you (who have used adapters) can offer me when running a setup like this. I would especially like to know what results are produced from different frame rates (24p, 60i, etc.) and any problems with functionality and practicality while using this adapter. I've also heard that you get a mirror-image flip when shooting with an adapter...that ever present any problems for you guys? Is it just as simple as reversing it in post?

Any advice or insight would be appreciated.
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#2 Pete Von Tews

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 02:22 AM

Hi Steven,

I would advise that you have your back focus set (meaning the hvx is focused precisely on the cinescreen) once set, put a piece of white camera tape on the side of the M2 with the focus/zoom numbers. Also make sure that the M2 is running when you shoot. Sometimes its easy to forget to turn it on. Also have space 9v batteries and the little hex wrenches that came with the M2. The footage is easily flipped/flopped in most editing programs. As far as lighting, usually you will have to use a bit more light.

-pete
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 02:43 AM

From what I recall of the RR, it eats about 2 stops of light. Also it adds a bit of "diffusion," due to the spinning GG. It also makes the camera awkward to hand-hold. When executed well the RR can yield very good results, though truth be told I am not a big fan of it in particular. Also remember, you'll be looking at an inverted image in the viewfinder; so allow yourself time to acclimate to it when shooting.
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#4 Steve Nayhi

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 03:04 AM

Thanks for the quick replies!

Adrian: I've seen the diffusion in test footage before. Are there any tricks to minimizing this effect? Also, I don't understand why anyone would want to shoot looking through a viewfinder with an inverted image...how were you able to adjust to that? How were you affected by that?
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 03:40 AM

Also, I don't understand why anyone would want to shoot looking through a viewfinder with an inverted image...how were you able to adjust to that? How were you affected by that?


Use an external monitor. And while you're at it, a real HD monitor is best to check the backfocus on the groundglass (when it's not spinning). Without an HD monitor it can be hard to see the groundglass pattern for critical backfocus (the "focus assist" feature helps).

I don't trust tape on the lens for setting the backfocus. The HVX focus is servo-driven, not mechanically linked, and therefore can drift.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 03:40 AM

Some cameras, though I don't recall which right now, can invert it again for you, else you're stuck with it and have to adjust for it. It's just how the optics work.
As for the diffusion, there isn't any way around that, as you're looking at the ground glass which is acting as a relay between the still lens and the video lens.
The still lens projects the image onto the GG, which is then re-recorded by the camera. The only way to get rid of it, as far as I know, would be to not use an adapter and mount a new lens onto the camera- obviously not an option for the HVX. I have heard of some adapter systems which don't use GG, at least I'm pretty sure I have heard of them, but I presently(as it's 4 am here!) can't think of any.
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#7 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 02:56 PM

As for the diffusion, there isn't any way around that, as you're looking at the ground glass which is acting as a relay between the still lens and the video lens.
The still lens projects the image onto the GG, which is then re-recorded by the camera.


Ground glass, piece of plastic from a milk carton or an aerial image; you're rephotographing an image from one optical system with another optical system, the relatively cheap zoom on the camera.
Multiplying the optical systems is the source of softer images.

Your final image will always be softer than that of any one of the optical systems alone.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 03:13 PM

If you're working at varying frame rates and shutter angles, make sure the spinning groundglass is in phase with the speed you're shooting at. You should do this with an HD monitor, no lens on the adapter and with the camera pointed at some light source. Then you adjust the speed until you don't see anymore of the weird fluttering artifacts which you'll notice.

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 26 January 2008 - 03:14 PM.

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