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Roger deakins is a god


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#1 Peter Anderson

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 02:01 PM

Im shooting S16 with an Arriflex SR2. What would be my best bet to imitate the colour of light in these shots?

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#2 John Holland

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 02:11 PM

the wide shot you have posted shows sodium vapour street lights yellow, get a swatch book from Lee or Rosco whack a light on a subject . Look at the various options you have there look just put it to your eye and decide what looks best to you , lighting is all about using your eyes and being bold . go for it .
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#3 Xavier Plaza

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 03:35 PM

why don't you ask him?, perhaps he could say to you wahtever you want... And then you can tell us what he said...

http://www.rogerdeakins.com/forum/
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#4 JD Hartman

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 03:52 PM

THE same question has been asked several times before. Try the search funchion.
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#5 Peter Anderson

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 04:31 PM

THE same question has been asked several times before. Try the search funchion.


I was more interested in the combination of lighting, film stock and post work. I couldn't get the yellowish colour using the techniques suggested in the current posts. The gel combinations gave a much too orangey tone that I found unappealing and wondered if they where intended to be combined with grading.
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#6 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 02:07 PM

i just saw this film today. It looks like RD has chosen to use a Sodium look that is closer to the way dSLRs see it (more brown/yellow) than video or film. A couple of minutes looking at a swatch book suggested to me that something like LEE 013 Straw Tint & Lee 245 Half Plus Green might get you close. Using a straw gel rather than an orange you'll lose the pink tinge, and the plus green will get you that sickly yellow look. Test, test, test.
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#7 Peter Anderson

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 02:35 PM

i just saw this film today. It looks like RD has chosen to use a Sodium look that is closer to the way dSLRs see it (more brown/yellow) than video or film. A couple of minutes looking at a swatch book suggested to me that something like LEE 013 Straw Tint & Lee 245 Half Plus Green might get you close. Using a straw gel rather than an orange you'll lose the pink tinge, and the plus green will get you that sickly yellow look. Test, test, test.


Ill be testing the following next week

Dirty White (744) / Burnt Yellow (770) / Chrome Orange (179) / Super White Flame (232) / Bastard Amber (162)

Ill add Straw Tint and Half Plus green to the list. Any other suggestions would be much appreciated.
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#8 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 02:54 PM

I was more interested in the combination of lighting, film stock and post work. I couldn't get the yellowish colour using the techniques suggested in the current posts. The gel combinations gave a much too orangey tone that I found unappealing and wondered if they where intended to be combined with grading.


Last year I worked with Shane Hurlbut, ASC. He designed lights that burn at the same temperature as sodium vapors. He would clip them on to lamp posts to get more stop from the practicals for close ups, or mount them on condors for wide shots. Thing is I can't remember where he got them from, since he is the designer but someone else built them. I understand he is busy right now filming, otherwise I would ask him directly. . . I'll ask his assistant, she may know.

You may want to ask some of the SoCal rental houses for this kind of light if you are in that neck of the woods. . .

As far as post techniques, your colorist can tweak the colors as they are telecined if you supervise it, a 2k Da Vinci has SO MUCH control over color is sick. Also, Color, the companion Final Cut Pro app, will let you tweak hues and color (and replace them) to your heart's content. Or you can tweak your printer lights if you are going to a film print.
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#9 Mike Williamson

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 03:29 PM

If you're doing testing, my advice would be to test combinations of gels. I think Stuart's advice to look at Straw and 1/2 Plus Green is a good idea, and I would follow the idea of testing something warm with different strengths of Plus Green to get that green tinge. Put up Bastard Amber and some of the other warm gels with 1/2 Plus Green, and so on.
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#10 Peter Anderson

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 01:29 PM

My main problem is that i have neither the time or money to test on any more film stock so ll be using a digital camera (Nikon D70). How closely will i be able to gauge what the final colour reproduction will look like on film? (Kodak stock 7217, 7205 & 7219).
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#11 Sean English

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Posted 23 March 2009 - 08:52 PM

I do believe if I remember correctly from Roger's lighting diagrams, that he used Lee Half CTO (205) and Lee Straw Tint (013). I know this is an old post, but perhaps it might help any future testers out there.
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