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#1 kyle ragaller

kyle ragaller
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Posted 30 January 2008 - 03:01 PM

I am shooting my first piece on Super-8 for my production class this semester. I am planning on shooting black and white in classic Noir fashion, but am not familiar with the image quality associated with Kodak's different raw stocks. I am wondering if I can get an explanation of the image quality the stocks available to me provide. The stocks that are available to me are Kodak Tri-X B/W Reversal and Kodak Plus-X B/W Reversal. Again, I am using classic Noir films as inspiration for the look and feel of my film, and am needing help with understanding what the difference is between Tri-X and Plus-X film stocks.

p.s. What is a desirable speed for shooting in the low-key atmosphere associated with these shoots.

If it isn't obvious, I am new to film. All my previous work has been done on video or digital. Thanks for the help and I will be active throughout the forums with questions, so I am sure we'll meet again.

kyle.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
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Posted 30 January 2008 - 03:18 PM

The main difference between them is sensitivity, i.e. "speed".

Plus-X reversal is 80 ASA in tungsten / 100 ASA in daylight -- Tri-X reversal is 160 ASA in tungsten / 200 ASA in daylight. B&W stocks are slightly more sensitive to the blue end of the spectrum, hence why they are a little faster in 5500K daylight instead of 3200K tungsten light, which has more red in the it.

A slower stock will be finer-grained than a faster stock, so your question to answer is if you can manage to light your interior scenes for a stock as slow in speed as Plus-X. Luckily with b&w noir lighting, you can work in hard light so a collection of 650w, 1K's, and 2K's tungstens may get you enough exposure for 80 ASA stock.

You should light a small scene to see if you can manage it.

And you should just shoot a little of both stocks to see the difference.

Reversal stocks have to be exposed carefully, there isn't much room for mistakes. Here are some frames from a VHS copy of a Super-8 short I did shot on Plus-X:

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

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