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Which color stock?


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#1 Ashley Barron

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 04:05 PM

Hi,
I am now looking for a color stock that is the best to shoot for rich, deep colors. We will be photographing artwork, and it is very vibrant, so I want to bring out those colors.
Anyone have any ideas on the best stock?
Thank you,
Ashley.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 04:22 PM

Personally, I havn't noticed a marked difference in color negative stocks in terms of this. A lot of it boils down to your lighting as well as your art and costume design/makeup and locations. For an example, the bright red wall in the number 23 was just that, a wall painted bright red.
You can up saturation and contrast later on in post, from what I've been told by a colorist i work with, it's best to over-expose the stock a little bit which will also tighten up the grain structure and increase the saturation.
That being said, I personally find the colors of the 5217/7217 kodak the most pleasing to me, and also that of the '18 stock.

of course if you're shooting reversal film you'll have higher saturation from the get go. check out the '85 for a daylight stock.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 05:18 PM

Hi,
I am now looking for a color stock that is the best to shoot for rich, deep colors. We will be photographing artwork, and it is very vibrant, so I want to bring out those colors.
Anyone have any ideas on the best stock?
Thank you,
Ashley.


If color saturation on camera is what you want, you should probably bypass the negative stocks and go directly to Kodak Ektachrome '85 reversal film, as nothing beats it for color saturation.

http://www.kodak.com...o...5.6.4&lc=en
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 06:41 PM

Hi,
I am now looking for a color stock that is the best to shoot for rich, deep colors. We will be photographing artwork, and it is very vibrant, so I want to bring out those colors.
Anyone have any ideas on the best stock?
Thank you,
Ashley.



Take a look at Fuji Vivid 160T. As the name implies, it renders vivid colors. When you say artwork, do you mean flat art such as paintings and the lot? If so, you want to make sure that there isn't any glare on them and that they are lit evenly and flat. This will get you the best reproduction of the artwork.

All in all, it depends on what you are photographing and how it will be shown in the end. Motion picture shots of 2D art? Or people in places speaking some masterful dialogue that you have penned? Color reversal will probably render the most vibrant colors. Also take a look at Velvia, if you can find it.
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#5 Steve Zimmerman

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 02:07 AM

This german site sells S8mm and 16mm Velvia.

http://www.wittner-k...mm/16_filmm.php

Order page in English:
http://www.wittner-k...der/order_e.php

Edited by Steve Zimmerman, 31 January 2008 - 02:11 AM.

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#6 Ashley Barron

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 02:40 PM

That being said, I personally find the colors of the 5217/7217 kodak the most pleasing to me, and also that of the '18 stock.

of course if you're shooting reversal film you'll have higher saturation from the get go. check out the '85 for a daylight stock.


I never understood what the 5217/7217 digits mean when written on a stock. Same goes for the '18 and '85..
Anyone help me out?
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#7 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 04:44 PM

52 is a prefix which designated 35mm film, '17 is then the stock (200T). so 5217 is 35mm Kodak vision 2 200T color negative. 72 is the kodak prefix for 16mm film, so 7217 is then 16mm kodak vision 2 200T. '18 then refers to the vision 2 500T, without prefix it's just the emulsion in general, whereas 7218 would be specifically 16mm (though in reality there is no difference aside from the physical size of each emulsion i.e. 7218 is the same emulsion as 5218).

Fuji also has different prefixes for 35mm and 16mm, though off hand i don't recall them (86? i think might be 16mm?)

Edited by Adrian Sierkowski, 01 February 2008 - 04:45 PM.

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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 05:31 PM

Fuji color neg prefix:
85 = 35mm
86 = 16mm

As you said, for Kodak:
52 = 35mm
72 = 16mm

Then the last two digits refer to the specific stock. In Kodak:
01 = 50D
12 = 100T
17 = 200T
05 = 250D
18 = 500T
19 = new Vision-3 500T
29 = Expression 500T
99 = "HD" stock

In Fuji:
22 = 64D
32 = 100T
43 = Vivid 160T
53 = 250T
63 = 250D
83 = 400T (low-con)
73 = 500T
92 = Reala 500D
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#9 Michal Grabowski

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 07:35 AM

Hi,
i've been shooting some comparison tests with the 18 and 19, pushed it 1 and 2 stops. There isn't much difference between them. It is sharper than 18 but the grain seems to be a little bigger, which is a suprise. But generally it's pretty much the same thing.
And if you're thinking about pushing, 18 seems to have a bigger dynamic range after Push 2. I like the older stock better, or there's simply not much to like about a new one. Vision 2 after a tiny face lifting.
I can't show you the tests cause they were contact printed. But maybe some day the lab is goingbe generous enaugh to scan it for me.


Good luck with your film
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#10 Michal Grabowski

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 07:44 AM

sorry, the previous post was ought to goon a different forum.

Where you thinking about reversal film. The colors are absolutely fantastic. Check it out. Kodak manufacters some. don't remeber the number.
But due to a steeper gamma the colors are as vivid as it gets.
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#11 Ashley Barron

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 04:57 PM

Thank you David and Adrian, that was really helpful, I really appreciate it.
Ashley
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#12 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 05:56 PM

Glad I could help :D
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