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Shafts of Light


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#1 Colin Rich

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 06:42 PM

What is the best way to maximize shafts of light? I know it helps to have something in the atmosphere (smoke, fog, etc) and I'm assuming it helps to have very concentrated beams.
The scene will be shot on 7218 or 7219. The shafts of light are suppose to represent bars as in a jail cell. I appreciate the advice!
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 07:10 PM

What is the best way to maximize shafts of light? I know it helps to have something in the atmosphere (smoke, fog, etc) and I'm assuming it helps to have very concentrated beams.
The scene will be shot on 7218 or 7219. The shafts of light are suppose to represent bars as in a jail cell. I appreciate the advice!


It's a combination of a sharp and bright beam of light shining through an even layer of haze. The more the light is pointing into the lens (i.e. backlighting the smoke) the more visible it will be. The more overexposed the light is too, the more visible... especially if it is framed against darkness (you can't see a beam of light as well against a light background.)
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#3 Colin Rich

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 10:03 PM

It's a combination of a sharp and bright beam of light shining through an even layer of haze. The more the light is pointing into the lens (i.e. backlighting the smoke) the more visible it will be. The more overexposed the light is too, the more visible... especially if it is framed against darkness (you can't see a beam of light as well against a light background.)



Thanks a lot for your help! I'm one of the many, many young cinematographers who has gained much from your replies on this forum.
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#4 James Brown

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 07:44 AM

I'm assuming it helps to have very concentrated beams.


Hi,

Depending on how strong you want the shafts of light i would recommend Mole Richardson's Molebeams.

Molebeam

Regards, James
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#5 Colin Rich

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 12:08 PM

Hi,

Depending on how strong you want the shafts of light i would recommend Mole Richardson's Molebeams.

Molebeam

Regards, James


Unfortunately I'm on too tight of a budget for molebeams. Do you think 1000w fresnels with snoots would work?
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#6 John Holland

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 12:16 PM

Try to get hold of some Par-Cans they arnt expensive and will do what you want .
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 12:36 PM

Try to get hold of some Par-Cans they arnt expensive and will do what you want .


Yes, get a 1K tungsten PARCAN with a very narrow spot globe (nicknamed "Firestarters") or a spot globe.
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CineTape

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The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Wooden Camera