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Filter use on Panasonic HVX 200 to give soft dreamy image


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#1 Jessica Greene

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Posted 06 February 2008 - 04:47 PM

Hi All,

I'm shooting a graduation film on the Panasonic HVX 200 shooting to P2 cards. I'm going to use the Cine setting and want to give the film quite a fashion photography look. Inspiration has so far come from photographs in Vogue and other fashion magazines. Most scenes happen outside with quite a summery carefree feel to them. I have attached a photograph to give an idea of the desired look.

The director wants to use wide angle lens but retain lowish depth of field. Ie he wants blurry backgrounds. I figure I'll need to shoot with a fair amount of ND and keep the focused subject close.

I know another more preferable option would be a prime lens adapter which we are considering but some work will include using a glide cam and I am concerned that it would create too much weight.

The main question I wanted to ask was advice on filtration. I was thinking in addition to ND using something like a black pro mist to give a softer image. Or perhaps a net of some sort, I'd like to create a kind of dreamy image and if possible increase the chance of creating lens flare. Still early days so I have chance to do tests but I was just wondering if anyone could suggest any interesting techniques they know about which I could use to give my images a bit more oomph!!

Many thanks,

Jessica Greene
Student DP
Newcastle
UK

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#2 pascal Boyer

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 08:39 AM

Hi All,

I'm shooting a graduation film on the Panasonic HVX 200 shooting to P2 cards. I'm going to use the Cine setting and want to give the film quite a fashion photography look. Inspiration has so far come from photographs in Vogue and other fashion magazines. Most scenes happen outside with quite a summery carefree feel to them. I have attached a photograph to give an idea of the desired look.

The director wants to use wide angle lens but retain lowish depth of field. Ie he wants blurry backgrounds. I figure I'll need to shoot with a fair amount of ND and keep the focused subject close.

I know another more preferable option would be a prime lens adapter which we are considering but some work will include using a glide cam and I am concerned that it would create too much weight.

The main question I wanted to ask was advice on filtration. I was thinking in addition to ND using something like a black pro mist to give a softer image. Or perhaps a net of some sort, I'd like to create a kind of dreamy image and if possible increase the chance of creating lens flare. Still early days so I have chance to do tests but I was just wondering if anyone could suggest any interesting techniques they know about which I could use to give my images a bit more oomph!!

Many thanks,

Jessica Greene
Student DP
Newcastle
UK


Hello Jessica ,
i'm not sure the image you attached is very usefull ... anyway have you thinked about using white promist or warm promist ? I think they will help you achieve this dreamy look or mayby the filter "fog" but this is more out of focus "david lynch" dreamy . Also for the flares ,post production might help .
good luck
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 11:59 AM

Short of pushing in so tight that it becomes macro photography, wide-angle lenses + 1/3" sensors = deep focus. You may have to consider a 35mm adaptor like the P&S Technik one, or the others, if you really want a shallow-focus wide-angle look.
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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 05:08 PM

Hi All,

I'm shooting a graduation film on the Panasonic HVX 200 shooting to P2 cards. I'm going to use the Cine setting and want to give the film quite a fashion photography look. Inspiration has so far come from photographs in Vogue and other fashion magazines. Most scenes happen outside with quite a summery carefree feel to them. I have attached a photograph to give an idea of the desired look.

The director wants to use wide angle lens but retain lowish depth of field. Ie he wants blurry backgrounds. I figure I'll need to shoot with a fair amount of ND and keep the focused subject close.

I know another more preferable option would be a prime lens adapter which we are considering but some work will include using a glide cam and I am concerned that it would create too much weight.

The main question I wanted to ask was advice on filtration. I was thinking in addition to ND using something like a black pro mist to give a softer image. Or perhaps a net of some sort, I'd like to create a kind of dreamy image and if possible increase the chance of creating lens flare. Still early days so I have chance to do tests but I was just wondering if anyone could suggest any interesting techniques they know about which I could use to give my images a bit more oomph!!

Many thanks,

Jessica Greene
Student DP
Newcastle
UK

Jessica,

Wide angle lenses and low depth of field don't really go together, particularly with 1/3" chip cameras. You could use something like the P&S teknik adaptor, as David suggests, but they suck up a lot of light, and you WILL need a decent focus puller.

As far as that summery 'fashion' look goes, lens flares are good, but you could also try raising the blacks a little and lowering the saturation to emulate a flashed look.
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#5 Jessica Greene

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 11:40 AM

Firstly thank you all for your replies, much appreciated.

I've tested the 1/4 BPM quite liking that but if I can get my fingers on a white PM I'd be keen to try that, thanks for the suggestion.

Have now taken the director out and politely shown him wide angle & shallow DOF aint an easy mix. He's also wanted telephoto shots so we're looking at either a 35mm adapter or a different camera though must say I'm liking the images I'm getting from the HVX. Another issue is focus pulling, the director (a fellow student) does not want any other crew, so far Ive failed to point out I need an assistant as well as wanting one. Ive got several offers from local DPs who I assist for too :( Hopefully by showing your reply about needing one will help my case.

My concern again with this was not being able to get the camera and adapter to balance on the steady rig, which will hopefully be a Glidecam V 25. I'm going for a training session and to look at it tomorrow so I will have much better idea by then. But if anyone has any previous experience of this set up or advice that'd be great.

Kind regards,

Jessica
Student DP
UK



PS sorry about the image not being much use, I just thought I'd try attach it to add to my post.
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