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chimera "do it yourself"


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#1 Matteo Cocco

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 10:12 AM

Hello everybody!
has anyone a good link to a website that explains how to build a cheap Chimera Softlight?
thankyou!
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#2 F Bulgarelli

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:58 PM

you can probably built a homemade chimera using the same principles used for the "covered wagon"

Take a square piece of plywood, attached some porcelain sockets for your bulbs, built a dome out of chicken wire and throw muslim over it. there you have it.

I'll send you a picture of my covered wagon so you can see what I'm talking about.

Also, don't forget that a china ball is like a chimera, specially if you cover half of it with black.

Francisco
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#3 Chris Keth

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 05:13 PM

I've made them before by making a pyramid out of foamcore and cutting the tip off so it will fit a speedring. The base gets covered with the diff of choice.
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#4 Walter Graff

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 06:50 PM

How about a simple frame and diffusion. I use these with everything from diffusion to reflectors (they sell a bunch of slip ons) and it works great. Its a real inexpensive solutuion that acts as a few diferent light sources. I have four and they are a major part of most of what I do.

http://www.bhphotovi...rame_Panel.html

And if not, the easiest way to make a homemade box is to make a rectangle or square out of foam core. White side inside. Use duct tape to seam the foamcore so that it is a square box or rectangle and then folds flat for storage. And when you use it, tape diffusion on one side to make it a rigid box. Fire a light into the other side. Simple 'Chimera'
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#5 Mike Andrade

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 10:08 PM

I've also used these Litepanels with great success. They're cheap, light and easy to set up. I've used mine for a nice soft source indoors with a Lowel DP or as an overhead with a nook light.

Edited by Mike Andrade, 10 February 2008 - 10:09 PM.

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#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 02:34 AM

I was thinking of getting a couple of those Photoflex LitePanels.

Walter, have you had any troubles with the PVC piping? I hear it can be a bit too flimsy. They make steel tubing ones too, but if the PVC's fine I just might get'em.
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#7 Walter Graff

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 07:29 AM

Yes they make a more expensive version but the black PVC version has not given me any problems and I've abused them pretty bad. It's good thick stuff with well made L corners and snaps together easy. I've got a bunch of the different kinds of material they sell so can have diffusion, a black, or a reflector in a minute. I use a photo clamp to attach them to stands although they also sell their own adapter which I do not have. They are especially great for hanging above a scene because of their light weight. Great for a dining room scene. Considering the convenience and cost, I just don't think there is a better bargain when it comes to collapsible frames.
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#8 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 01:39 PM

Excellent. I suppose cardellini's are a good way of attaching them to a stand too. I'll probably get myself a pair. Now I just have to decide between the 39x39 or 39x72, or perhaps one of each :)
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#9 Walter Graff

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 01:49 PM

I'd imagine cardellinis would be great.
Indoors I use one photo clamp from the bottom on a stand with the 39x39 if I have no traffic around.
outdoors I use two C stands with four spring clamps. The 39x72 of course uses two stands anywhere.
What I like best is that you can get a bunch of fabrics for it and have what you need all in a nice little ziploc bag. I have black, silver/gold, and diffusion. One frame, I'm set. ANd if I need a second I pop it out of the light kit and snap it into a square.
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