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What's your favorite horror film?


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#1 F Bulgarelli

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 03:50 PM

Hello everyone,

I will be shooting a low budget horror feature in March and I'm looking for references for the look, camera movement, lighting, etc.

The story is about a group of people that go on a vacation trip to the mountains and get attacked by a serial killer. Yeah, I know, you've heard it before ;-)

Is there any particular films out there that caught your eye?

Any comments will be greatly appreciated,

Francisco
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 04:44 PM

Hello everyone,

I will be shooting a low budget horror feature in March and I'm looking for references for the look, camera movement, lighting, etc.

The story is about a group of people that go on a vacation trip to the mountains and get attacked by a serial killer. Yeah, I know, you've heard it before ;-)

Is there any particular films out there that caught your eye?

Any comments will be greatly appreciated,

Francisco


Yes we've heard it before, so just add a twist ending. They are all really characters in a video game being played on-line by a group of teenagers, or one of them is actually the killer with a spilt personality, or they've all been captured by aliens and are being "observed" by more intelligent beings from a far off galaxy out to study "man", or........well I got a million of em'

R,
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#3 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 08:49 PM

I liked that Black Christmas remake for a number of its camera angles.
I?m not sure if the style of shots they used is cliché or campy or retro or whatnot, but they dialed in something in keeping with the genre that also made it enjoyable to look at here and there.
It seemed perfect for off setting a bit of the same old same old.
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#4 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 10:29 PM

A few really though there are a BUNCH that I really, really like these I find inspirational in:

The Shining

Jaws

Poltergeist

From Dusk Till Dawn

Suspiria (Dario Argento)

The Devil's Backbone

Planet of the Vampires (Mario Bava)

Black Sabbath (Also Mario Bava)
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#5 Michael Waite

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 11:04 PM

Eyes Without A Face

Night Of The Living Dead

Texas Chainsaw Massacre
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#6 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 12:00 AM

I would definitely recommend to study all of George A Romero's (see above) and John Carpenter's films, the latters however only up to the early 1990s.

Include non-mainstream works of them, too, like "Martin" by Romero where you can learn alot about narrative construction through the camera work.

Also consider Japanese horror movies of the 1980s and 1990s, which are really scary even by todays standard, although they employ very few grizzly slashing effects or jumpy slashers. Channel 4 broadcast several recently, and they sure scared the poop out of me... :huh:

Although the storyline you put forward is as smashed-up and trotten-on as an armadillo after an encounter with an 18-wheeler, it is the conceptual approach of the entire film rhethoric you employ for filming that can really make a difference.

So it is actually less about chosen camera angles and silly lighting-&-fog and how to "surprise" the audience through "clever" editing or even a twist at the end, it's about the entire approach you choose: the cinematic psychology, if you want! With a hard-working-to-invent-it brainiac session behind you, that'll give you a pretty über-scary result even for today's hardened teenie-slasher audiences.

If, however, you are after the usual combine of first-fu**-teenie-movie meets outdoors-slasher-movie, then watching "Nightmare on Elm Street V", "Jason I to X "and, to top it off, "I still really give a poop what you did to everyone last sumer" might suffice ;) !

PLEASE, however, avoid VomitCam ® -style ideas as seen in that "Witch-in-the-Woods-Project" video 8 nonsense or worse: "Cloverfield".
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#7 James Baker

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 02:51 AM

Suspiria

Rosemary's Baby

Peeping Tom

The Haunting (the original 1963 version)

The Innocents

Au Rendezvous de la Mort Joyeuse
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#8 A. Whitehouse

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 09:46 AM

Ringu

Anything by Hideo Nakata

Ju-on
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#9 F Bulgarelli

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 01:49 PM

Thank you all, this is really useful.
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#10 Michael Waite

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 07:59 AM

PLEASE, however, avoid VomitCam ® -style ideas as seen in that "Witch-in-the-Woods-Project" video 8 nonsense or worse: "Cloverfield".

Yeah - please, no shaky video camera work. That's a different kind of horror.
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#11 John Holland

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 01:53 PM

"Death Line" ,set on the London Underground tube 1971 . shot buy the late Alex Thomson BSC. But no.1 still to me is " The Exorcist"
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#12 Mike Washlesky

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 03:01 PM

A few really though there are a BUNCH that I really, really like these I find inspirational in:

The Shining

Jaws

Poltergeist

From Dusk Till Dawn

Suspiria (Dario Argento)

The Devil's Backbone

Planet of the Vampires (Mario Bava)

Black Sabbath (Also Mario Bava)



Planet of the Vampires eh? I thought I was the only one that has seen that. LOVE that movie. Especially their awesome motorcycle leathers/space suits. That film really creates some freaky and moody atmosphere. Cameron totally borrows alot from that flick including the bone ship and dead giants.

I thought From Dusk Till Dawn was a comedy. My mistake.

The Thing is one of my favorites...
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#13 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 03:10 PM

The Seventh Victim

Viy

The Bride of Frankenstein
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#14 Mike Williamson

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 05:01 PM

As Leo mentions, "The 7th Victim" and all the Val Lewton horror films are great. There's a box set that they put out that's really fantastic, specifically I would also mention "Cat People", "Curse of the Cat People" and "I Walked With A Zombie". All of those titles were shot by Nic Musuraca.

I've been watching a bunch of Daniel Pearl's films lately, great cinematography in the horror genre even when the movies themselves aren't that good. I'd look at the remake of "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and "Pathfinder", and I actually thought "Captivity" looked nice as well.
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#15 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 12:05 AM

Planet of the Vampires eh? I thought I was the only one that has seen that. LOVE that movie. Especially their awesome motorcycle leathers/space suits. That film really creates some freaky and moody atmosphere. Cameron totally borrows alot from that flick including the bone ship and dead giants.

I thought From Dusk Till Dawn was a comedy. My mistake.

The Thing is one of my favorites...


That movie was a lesson in creating atmosphere. Mario Bava was simply a genius. Style is also the reason I loved From Dusk till Dawn. I find a lot of humor in horror films, I even find humorous elements in the Exorcist. :D The Thing is an INCREDIBLE movie (the original, though I did like the Carpenter re-imagined version) I also liked the Blob. (both versions actually though how ya gonna beat Steve McQueen) B) And of course the classics, Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, The Mummy, the Creature from the Black Lagoon, all the 50s sci/fil and atomic monsters I LOVE 'em!!!

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 12 February 2008 - 12:08 AM.

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#16 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 12:11 AM

Yeah - please, no shaky video camera work. That's a different kind of horror.


HEY, Nothin' wrong with a little shaky cam, It worked GREAT in The Evil Dead series!!! :D
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#17 Michael Lehnert

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 02:43 AM

Yeah, but that was in 1981, and Sam Raimi had to prove something to someone. That was also at a time when most parents of the current slasher-movie cinema-goin' generation of viewers had just discovered MTV and did not contemplate having children of their own... ever.
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#18 chris dye

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:49 AM

The Other from 1972 has interesting camera work, I think. Also I like Bava's camera work in Lisa and the Devil. Lush and elegant. I also like these for some of their camera work and lighting:

The Innocents
The original Black Christmas
Let's Scare Jessica to Death
Magic

Anything from the seventies actually. Even the bad horror movies from this era evoked great atmosphere.
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#19 Jason Sikorski

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 07:59 AM

Rosemary's Baby sticks out in my mind as one of the better horror films I've seen. I also enjoyed my first few J-Horror films (the Japanese original Dark Water was terrific), but I believe they lose their "edge" after a while due to the high number of recurring motifs.

When I was a kid, something about the The Gate (a B-movie if there ever was one) terrified the living %*!# out of me. I remember having nightmares for weeks after seeing it for the first time. Subsequent viewings (much later in life) left me wondering why I found it so terrifying. :)
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#20 Mike Washlesky

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 10:27 AM

Rosemary's Baby sticks out in my mind as one of the better horror films I've seen. I also enjoyed my first few J-Horror films (the Japanese original Dark Water was terrific), but I believe they lose their "edge" after a while due to the high number of recurring motifs.

When I was a kid, something about the The Gate (a B-movie if there ever was one) terrified the living %*!# out of me. I remember having nightmares for weeks after seeing it for the first time. Subsequent viewings (much later in life) left me wondering why I found it so terrifying. :)



Oh man The Gate scared the crap outta me! I saw that in the theater and havent seen it since. Maybe on cable a few years ago, but I love the build up to the ending. Pretty effective film for building tension slowly with the bugs and the little monsters. Man, I havent thought about that film in years.

I absolutely loved The Host from S. Korea, from a few years ago. great classic monster flick for sure


To be honest, I love pretty much any horror film from the 70's and 80's, even Slumber Party Massacre and Basket Case. Even Driller Killer with the killer going around with a battery powered drill all the while wearing this ridiculously giant battery belt.

Edited by Mike Washlesky, 12 February 2008 - 10:30 AM.

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