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Shooting outdoors, B/W, Super8


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#1 kyle ragaller

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 06:26 PM

I am working on a school project and we are required to shoot on Super-8. I am working on a script that is gonna be reminiscent of classic noir, shooting on B/W stock. There are a few outdoor scenes involved and my question is related to making the experience as painless as possible. I am familiar with the golden hour (half hour during sunrise, and half hour at sunset--approx.) as being one of the prime times for shooting, but I was wondering if there are techniques and tricks that people have learned that can make shooting during the daytime more pleasurable (especially at times other than the "golden hour"? Would a clear day be preferable to a cloudy (in terms of having to take constant light meter readings)?

I have been trying to work around exterior shooting but am in a sort of writing rut and wont be able to work around the exterior shots in time of my deadline. What are some of the techniques and tricks that you have learned through your experience that can be passed on to an aspiring cinematographer. Thanks for the help, I really appreciate it.

Not sure how else to pin down the question so if it is too vague, go ahead and ask some questions for clarity and I'll try and clear it up for you.

kyle.
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 07:45 PM

I am working on a school project and we are required to shoot on Super-8. I am working on a script that is gonna be reminiscent of classic noir, shooting on B/W stock. There are a few outdoor scenes involved and my question is related to making the experience as painless as possible. I am familiar with the golden hour (half hour during sunrise, and half hour at sunset--approx.) as being one of the prime times for shooting, but I was wondering if there are techniques and tricks that people have learned that can make shooting during the daytime more pleasurable (especially at times other than the "golden hour"? Would a clear day be preferable to a cloudy (in terms of having to take constant light meter readings)?

I have been trying to work around exterior shooting but am in a sort of writing rut and wont be able to work around the exterior shots in time of my deadline. What are some of the techniques and tricks that you have learned through your experience that can be passed on to an aspiring cinematographer. Thanks for the help, I really appreciate it.

Not sure how else to pin down the question so if it is too vague, go ahead and ask some questions for clarity and I'll try and clear it up for you.

kyle.



Kyle,

What is the mood of the script? Does it call for shooting at magic hour? Since you are shooting on B&W, the obvious "Golden" tone to everything won't matter. I always thought the benefit or beauty of Golden hour, is the color. Other than that, it is a very short and rapidly changing window in which to get your shots, so if you really don't have to, save yourself the headache and don't. Look at some of the classic noir outdoor shots and see what they did. Contrast and composition are your allies here. Meter for the highlights and throw light into the shadows as needed. B&W reversal has a limited exposure range, so be careful. It is always a safe bet to "slightly" underexpose reversal stock
Don't be afraid to use both stocks for your shoot, 7266 and 7265. THe plus - X will be invaluable for outdoor shots since it is a slower stock. As you will probably be transferring to video at some point, be sure to shoot a framing chart and a gray scale card at the head of your roll. Gray scale for each lighting set up change, framing chart just once for the very first roll.
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#3 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 08:46 PM

Hey Kyle,

I recently completed a short Super8 film shot on Plus X.

It was the second time I shot with Super8 and wanted the magic hour look to it. The film has a pretty heavy art house feel to it and I wanted the magic hour to compliment that. For all of the shots we used a yellow filter and ND filters where needed. The only other piece of equipment we had was a reflector and the film came out pretty well done.

I'm saying this because I think from what I gathered from your post my film has the same qualities you are going to aim for. I'll post or pm you a link to the film if you want to take a peak to see if that's what you are going for.

Hope that helps.. and what camera are you going to be using?
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#4 kyle ragaller

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 09:24 PM

Hey Kyle,

I recently completed a short Super8 film shot on Plus X.

It was the second time I shot with Super8 and wanted the magic hour look to it. The film has a pretty heavy art house feel to it and I wanted the magic hour to compliment that. For all of the shots we used a yellow filter and ND filters where needed. The only other piece of equipment we had was a reflector and the film came out pretty well done.

I'm saying this because I think from what I gathered from your post my film has the same qualities you are going to aim for. I'll post or pm you a link to the film if you want to take a peak to see if that's what you are going for.

Hope that helps.. and what camera are you going to be using?




The two replies have been helpful. First post: you are right, I am shooting black and white so the magic hour is pretty much a waste. I am still looking over some films to get a feel for their composition and lighting. For the second post, I would appreciate seeing what turned out of your film. I am confident for the indoor shots, but the outdoor shots are where I am lacking the experience. If underexposure by a tiny bit is considered "safe" for shooting Plus-x reversal than so be it. I would appreciate any other advice that is out there but I am taking what has been said into consideration. Thanks.

p.s. I am running a Canon 1218 Autozoom.

kyle.

Edited by kyle ragaller, 09 February 2008 - 09:27 PM.

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#5 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 11:18 PM

Hey Kyle,

Here is the link:

Popsicle
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

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