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Set up an interview!


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#1 Alex LaBore

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 07:56 PM

I would like to know what I should do for a background and lighting and such. Anyone who has put together an interview PLEASE REPLY!
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#2 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 06:29 AM

You should ask more specific questions and you'll probably get some great answers.
Also, you should include some info about the project, such as:
Where are you shooting? (int., ext.)
What type of project is it?
What kind of camera are you using?
What types of lights do you have?
Without at least some of this info and some less general questions it's very hard to give you an answer. Or, I could just tell you to sit them down, point a light at their face, and roll the camera.
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#3 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 10:55 AM

I don't have time for a really detailed response right now because, ironically, I have to go to work to light an interview! :)


Very quickly though, I'll try to boil it down. There ARE longer responses in these threads somewhere, so I'd suggest doing a search to find them...


subject to lens distance should be at least six feet.

Key with a soft source. If the interviewer is sitting on the left side of the camera (on the camera operator side) the key light should also be on that side. If the interviewer is on the left, the key goes on the left. If the subject is a male, the light can be about two feet from the camera to help produce a darker part of the face that is facing camera. If the subject is a female, pull the key light as close to lens as possible to create as few shadows as possible. With an older female, the key light should be lower, close to lens. A younger female can take a light that is positioned higher.

Back light should be mounted (on an extended Cstand arm or the like) diagonally opposite from the key. Have it on a dimmer if possible for quick adjustments once the interviewee has sat down.

As far as the background goes, it is all variable due to the room you're in, any extraneous light you can't control well (as from windows, etc), what the program calls for, any props you need to show in the background, etc.

Anybody can throw light up and get an image. Truly lighting for beauty and purpose can take time and experience. Good luck!
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#4 Walter Graff

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 11:10 AM

http://www.bluesky-w.../dvd1sample.mov
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#5 Alex LaBore

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 07:28 PM

Thanks for taking time out of your schedules to reply everyone!
I will be sure to read them all thoroughly...

And also thanks for the advice for the next post Brad.
If I have other questions I will be sure to be as specific as possible!

- Alex LaBore
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