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#1 Matt Garrett

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 03:34 PM

I am starting on a budget for a music video and the band is asking for the typical "wall of lights" behind them.
ala
http://myspacetv.com...ideoid=10337648
and
http://www.redcamser...age3/page3.html


What lights are typically used for this sort of thing and what boards to people prefer to use for the strobing?
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#2 David Auner aac

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:06 PM

Hi Matt,

I assume these are PARs. But we could ask the gaffer of this shoot what they used. His name is Alex Haspel and he is on the boards here.

Cheers, Dave
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#3 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:24 PM

Kevin Zanit shot a band with the look your looking for ( last year i think ) anyway it looked really good.
He posted in detail how he did it, search the forum or PM him he can help you out.

Kieran.
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#4 timHealy

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:52 PM

Hi Matt,

I assume these are PARs. But we could ask the gaffer of this shoot what they used. His name is Alex Haspel and he is on the boards here.

Cheers, Dave



I don't think you have to assume. You can see the gel frame ears on the heads.

They are 1 par can's probably rigged off of pipes and everything is blacked out behind it. Par can's are relatively cheap to rent but they are hooked up to dimmer packs. It looks as thought the lights were dimmed down to say 50 percent and some of them were bumbed up to 100 depending on what the camera sees and the rhythm of the music.

Best

Tim
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#5 Matt Garrett

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 04:53 PM

Thank you guys very much.
Will look into it.
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#6 Sebastian Andexer

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 06:07 PM

Those are either two dinos or super dinos, im not too sure. Maxis are pretty popular as well (alot smaller and easier to use than dinos). The nice part is that punch lights are pretty cheap to rent.
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#7 Matthew Parnell

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 08:18 PM

The lamps in the first link definitely are parcans, most likely Par64s, which are 1k lamps.
The second has two 30 lamp dinos. Which is basically a lamp that consists of 30x 1k par lamps.
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#8 Ken Minehan

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 09:33 PM

When you have SO many lights behind, pointing directly at the camera, how do you control the incredible amount of flare that you would get. A little bit of flare would be nice i assume, but with so many lights, is there anything you can do ?

regards
ken minehan
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#9 timHealy

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 11:05 AM

When you have SO many lights behind, pointing directly at the camera, how do you control the incredible amount of flare that you would get. A little bit of flare would be nice i assume, but with so many lights, is there anything you can do ?

regards
ken minehan



You can only use good or newer lenses with better antihalation coatings than what older lenses would have.

You can flag off the lights but as they are in your shot, so it kind of becomes it is what it is.

Since the pars are pointed straight at the camera you could use dimmer packs and dim them all down. They don't have to be 100 percent.

Different bulbs (Very narrow, frosted narrow, medium and wide) may give a different look but you may have to experiment with what it looks like when your are slightly off angle to see what you like best.

Tim
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#10 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 04:13 PM

Thanks for the complement Kieran,

The thread is:
http://www.cinematog...mp;#entry193138

I would agree, those look like PAR globes of some sort, I would bet the source there was a 36 light Dino, I think it is 6 globes tall by 6 wide in the photo (6*6=36)

I think a lot of the trick to shooting into the sources is good lenses keeping the flare under control and also making sure your talent really pops to begin with because when the lights behind them start blooming you can very easily loose the foreground.

Kevin Zanit
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#11 Alex Haspel

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 03:17 AM

I am starting on a budget for a music video and the band is asking for the typical "wall of lights" behind them.
ala
http://myspacetv.com...ideoid=10337648
and
http://www.redcamser...age3/page3.html


What lights are typically used for this sort of thing and what boards to people prefer to use for the strobing?


hi Matt,

as David already said, i was gaffing the second video.
people here are spot on with their estimations, yes,
we used 2 dinos, which (at least around here) consist of 30 par64 globes each.
and if i remember correctly, it was cp62 ones.
fast strobing was not required, we had them on dimmerpacks.

but the way we had to do it has been seen a million times, you better hold onto kevins video ;)

best of luck,
alex

Edited by Alex Haspel, 02 April 2008 - 03:21 AM.

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#12 Hal Smith

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 09:29 AM

I made DIY blinder for a project with a bunch of cheap surface mount edison sockets (like ceiling mount fixtures use) filled with clearance priced 75 watt PAR38's. Everything was mounted on a blacked out Hollywood (plywood) flat. Obviously it didn't have the "punch" of a real Dino but it was for a miniDV music video and looked just fine on camera.
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