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Should I shoot this wide open?


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#1 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 02:10 PM

I?m trying to achieve the look of this shot (taken from digital still) using 16mm Tri X with a Bolex.

I haven?t had a chance to meter the spots of light, or pinpoint the far ground light to just where I?d like it, but I?m wondering in general what the best approach to this look/feel with the given film stock and the light loss compensation might be.

Would you shoot it wide open on Tri-X or is it impossible to tell from a digital still without having the readings?

Thanks in advance for any advice or help.
:)
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 03:31 PM

What were the settings on your digital camera?
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#3 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:37 PM

Jonathan,

I'm not sure which setting you mean, but what the camera calls "Exposure Compensation" is set at 0.0, if that helps. Perhaps these color stills will allow further insight.

Thank You
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#4 Jason Reimer

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 05:12 PM

Jonathan,

I'm not sure which setting you mean, but what the camera calls "Exposure Compensation" is set at 0.0, if that helps. Perhaps these color stills will allow further insight.

Thank You


What he's getting at is that you need to know what ISO rating and what f-stop your camera was set at when the photos were taken. That's at least a starting place.
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#5 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:49 PM

Jason,

Thank you.

Unfortunately I don't know, my digital camera is like a joke that runs on batteries, so besides Sepia Tone, B&W, or a Time/Date Stamp, it doesn't really tell you anything or offer much to alter other than the exposure compensation which is adjustable between -2 or +2.

I did measure the spots of light, and the one on the table (No high slide inserted) is around 250 FC, the one on the lamp shade is around 125 FC.

Thanks
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#6 Jason Reimer

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 08:23 PM

Hey Buddy,
That's a great description of your camera! I don't have a whole lot of time to get back to your right now, but maybe someone else here can jump in and throw in their $.02. Just a few more questions to narrow things down:

Do you want a shallow or deep depth of field? Do you plan to push or pull process, or are you going to rate it normally?

If this is the film you're talking about, here's a link to some Kodak info on the stock that might help you:
http://www.kodak.com.../tech7266.jhtml

I hope that helps! Let us know how it goes.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 08:47 PM

Well, I'd probably let the spotlight on the lamp be about a stop overexposed on Tri-X to get that look. The question really is whether you need to increase the ambience in the shadows (maybe just a little weak bounce into the ceiling) to compensate for the contrast of Tri-X because the fall-off to black may be faster than what the DSLR is giving you.
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#8 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 09:17 PM

Jason,

I appreciate the info, link and time. I did have the info, but thank you for it still.

To answer your narrow down questions:
Shallow, regular processing, I don't know what rating it means to be honest.

For anyone that cares too help me sort this out, the area of uncertainy I am experiencing is,
I like the spot lit almost stage play kind of look, I will have an actress sitting at the table writing, so I need enough light from above to illuminate her hand holding a pen writing, but without blowing out over exposed, yet also be enough light to bounce up off the table and illuminate her face within reason.

I can always hit her face with an addtional light, but what I am really after is the "dramatic" look of all black except the two spot lit areas, but I don't want those areas over or under exposed, but being Tri X I am trying to avoid a grey muddy look as well.

Thanks

Edited by Buddy Greenfield, 15 February 2008 - 09:19 PM.

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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 09:27 PM

Don't you have a light meter?

With Tri-X, with an incident meter, figure that a caucasian face three-stops under will be near black and three-stops over will be white. One-stop over gives you a hot look but with detail, two-stops over will give you a very hot look but close to burning out to white. Generally the shadows should be two-stops under to look dim but with detail, three stops under for near black.

But the best thing would be to shoot a simple over and underexposure test and a lighting contrast ratio test.
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#10 Buddy Greenfield

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 11:29 PM

David,

A meter?

I'm just kidding. Yes I have a lightmeter, and the readings I obtained and posted should have answered my own questions, however in the grand scheme of things I'm just not the sharpest knife in the drawer, or even in the drawer for that matter, so thank you (once again and as always) for the explain,
you seem to have a real gift for seeing through and explaining that which is struggled with to be asked.
I appreciate you sharing that gift.

Many Thanks
:)
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