Jump to content


Photo

Injecting Movement


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Dalton Swift

Dalton Swift
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 February 2008 - 03:14 PM

Hello,
I am shooting a short next month. I have just been informed that most (all) the budget is going in to set dressing and our actors. There will be no money for a dolly.
Handheld would not be appropriate.
Anyone have ideas on how one could create camera movement on limited budget?

Dalton
  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 15 February 2008 - 05:21 PM

I know people often use wheel-chairs with a high-hat strapped to them as a make-shift dolly.
Basically anything with large pneumatic tires and some way to movie it can be a makeshift doorway dolly, though perhaps not too steerable.
Aside from that, if you want a low shot; get some dance-floor and a skateboard and you can stick the camera right on that and push it.
You could zoom, of course, but that's not really done as much anymore.
Also, you can just pan and tilt during the shots, slowly (see some of the opening shots of Solaris, the remake, i'm thinking of the shot in the large white cube room), just to give a little motion. Perhaps beginning on something and slowly panning/focusing to the main subject while the audio moves with them ?

Edited by Adrian Sierkowski, 15 February 2008 - 05:22 PM.

  • 0

#3 Dalton Swift

Dalton Swift
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 19 posts
  • Student

Posted 18 February 2008 - 08:13 PM

I think the dollying in and out are the moves I want to use the most. I am just worried that the wheelchair rig would be to cumbersome for a small push in.
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 18 February 2008 - 08:39 PM

I don't see how a small wheelchair, for a short push in would be any more cumbersome then a doorway dolly? I could be wrong in that, though, but I know from some of my experiences with doorways that they can be a pain in the a-- in tight quarters where a wheelchair would easily fit.
  • 0

#5 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 18 February 2008 - 10:11 PM

You should be able to borrow a wheel chair somewhere. Not long ago someone won an award for their work with a wheelchair dolly so it should be fine in a pinch, just can't boom though, WELL, can't have everything. B)
  • 0

#6 Matt Pacini

Matt Pacini
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1246 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 05:55 PM

I use a stripped down wheelchair for a dolly, and it works great, as long as your flooring is smooth.
I've made plywood snap together paths that I use when it's not.
I put a high-hat either on the seat, or on a larger board, on the armrests, or I sit in the chair and do hand-held from there.

Anyway, it's smaller, and more versatile than any dolly is, and you can spin circles in the damn thing!
I think you're just too embarrassed to show up with a wheelchair, but they've been used many times in professional productions.
And who cares, it's what you get on camera that counts, and I can tell you, I never go to a shoot without it!

MP
  • 0

#7 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 22 February 2008 - 06:06 PM

Prime example of professional use:
The diving bell and the butterfly Dp'd by Mr. Kaminski
  • 0

#8 Buddy Greenfield

Buddy Greenfield
  • Guests

Posted 24 February 2008 - 03:16 PM

A wheelchair would rule, and if possible would be my 1st choice for ease and effect, but depending how handy you are, and the size camera you are working with, a DIY jib like in the link below could add a shot or two. I'm in love with mine.

http://home.closetfi....asp?action=jib
  • 0


Opal

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

CineLab

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera