Jump to content


Photo

Using Daylight Balanced Film with Blue Filters


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Doron Kipper

Doron Kipper

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:24 PM

I'm shooting my first ever film project this weekend with Tungsten Film....so I don't think I'll have much problem with color temperature shooting with my Tungsten lights. But next week I'm participating in a group project for class that may use 250D 16mm (free...that's why we're not using tungsten). We're shooting with my tungsten balanced halogens...and I know that if I want to use the daylight film I'll have to get an 80A filter. Unfortunately, the lens on my bolex is a Pan Cinor 100 and very old...so I don't think it's likely I'll find a filter that fits it (and I don't particularly want to buy one for a camera I'm borrowing). The Bolex has a behind the lens filter for putting gels. When I borrowed it, it included an 85 gel for shooting tungsten in daylight, but I now need a blue gel for converting the other way.

I was wondering if I need an exact 80A/CTB gel or if I can use any approximate blue gel in this filter? I have a Blue gel that has a label on it reading 201....would that work for color temperature better than just shooting the film without it? Also, is it really necessary to use these conversion filters if in the end I'll be telecining the film and color correcting in Premiere Pro? I've never shot on film, so I don't know if the color temperature is something that can be remedied in post if I get it wrong on set.

Also, if I use a filter behind the lens (and it doesn't have a filter factor on the label)...should I take my meter readings with a gel over the lumisphere?

Thanks for any information....I've been getting some very helpful responses ever since I joined this board...thanks for everything.

Doron Kipper
  • 0

#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 15 February 2008 - 06:32 PM

I've taken a CTO gel from a Rosco swatch and used it as a gel filter on a Bolex before, and it worked great. So using the Lee 201 Full CTB should be fine. Just make sure it's immaculately clean and scratch free or else your footage will come out quite soft. You'll lose about 2 stops, so meter accordingly.

OR

you can just gel your lights with CTB, which will probably result in a sharper and cleaner image since you won't be placing any filter behind the lens.
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 15 February 2008 - 08:44 PM

I'd just use 1/2 CTB on the tungsten lights, let it be a little warm on the negative, and correct it in timing the transfer or print by shooting a grey scale first under the half-corrected light. A full 80A correction on the lights or camera is really too much exposure/output lost (two-stops, turning 250 ASA into 64 ASA if done on the camera.)
  • 0

#4 Freya Black

Freya Black
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4161 posts
  • Other
  • Went over the edge... Central Europe

Posted 16 February 2008 - 04:31 AM

I'd just use 1/2 CTB on the tungsten lights, let it be a little warm on the negative, and correct it in timing the transfer or print by shooting a grey scale first under the half-corrected light. A full 80A correction on the lights or camera is really too much exposure/output lost (two-stops, turning 250 ASA into 64 ASA if done on the camera.)


Hope I'm not hijacking this thread too much but I really like this idea David! :)
I actually like cinematography that is a little on the warm side anyway, like say shooting through an 81b filter or something. I'm wondering if the result of shooting like this with 1/2 CTBs and NOT colour correcting, would be too extreme. I know this is a matter of preferance but there surely comes a point where it just looks wrong for anyone and anyway I'd be intrested in hearing your opinion. :)

love

Freya
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Opal

Abel Cine

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Opal

The Slider

Ritter Battery

CineTape

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Rig Wheels Passport