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ED WOOD- TIM BURTON


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#1 Eti Tritto

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 07:57 AM

Hi!
I'm new here.
I need help analyzing the lightning in the movie "ED WOOD".
And I have no idea how to analyze lightning in a black and white film.
If anyone knows a bit about black and white lightining - please let me know....!!

Eti
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 07:11 PM

I'm pretty sure Ed Wood did it the old fashioned way (which is still used today by many) of placing some shutters in front of a light and opening & closing them rapidly. I think there might even be a shot of someone doing it in the actual movie.
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#3 David Auner aac

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 03:23 PM

I'm new here. I need help analyzing the lightning in the movie "ED WOOD".
And I have no idea how to analyze lightning in a black and white film.
If anyone knows a bit about black and white lightining - please let me know....!!


Hi Eti,

are you sure you mean lightNing, the short flash of light in a thunderstorm? Or are you referring to lighting, as in the way the movie is lit? Because I am wondering what might be special about a black and white lightning effect as compared to one in a color movie other than coloring the light a little on the blue side. Maybe I'm wrong, but I'm asking just to be sure I understood you correctly.

Regards, Dave
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#4 Eti Tritto

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 03:36 PM

Hi Eti,

are you sure you mean lightNing, the short flash of light in a thunderstorm? Or are you referring to lighting, as in the way the movie is lit? Because I am wondering what might be special about a black and white lightning effect as compared to one in a color movie other than coloring the light a little on the blue side. Maybe I'm wrong, but I'm asking just to be sure I understood you correctly.

Regards, Dave


Hi Dave!

I ment lighting, as in the way the movie is lit.
And I just want to know, if you have seen the movie Ed Wood, there's a lot of hard lightning and soft lightning. And I can't remember,is the shadows on the face lightning the hard one, or is it the one with no shadows at all?
And if you know or have thoughts about the lightning in this movie, I'll be more then happy to hear...
:-)

Thank u
Eti

Edited by Eti Tritto, 18 February 2008 - 03:38 PM.

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#5 David Auner aac

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 03:40 PM

I ment lighting, as in the way the movie is lit.
And I just want to know, if you have seen the movie Ed Wood, there's a lot of hard lightning and soft lightning. And I can't remember if the shadows on the face lightning is the hard one or the one with no shadows at all is. And if you know or have thoughts about the lightning in this movie, I'll be more then happy to hear... :-)


Hi Eti,

it's been quite a while since I have seen it, don't remember anything special about the way it was lit.. Usually, soft lighting has fewer perceptible shadows. You need to be more specific about what you want to know. Do you want to know how a certain effect is created?

Cheers, Dave
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#6 Eti Tritto

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 04:48 PM

Hi Eti,

it's been quite a while since I have seen it, don't remember anything special about the way it was lit.. Usually, soft lighting has fewer perceptible shadows. You need to be more specific about what you want to know. Do you want to know how a certain effect is created?

Cheers, Dave



Well..
I want to know how can I make big shadows (like, shadow of a man on a wall) how meany sources of light do I need?

And, smooth face with no shadow at all, how can I do that?

Eti
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#7 David Auner aac

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 03:47 AM

And, smooth face with no shadow at all, how can I do that?


Hi Eti,

to do that you'd usually use multiple very soft sources or one really large source. But I think the best idea for you is to get a couple of good books on lighting and start there. Take a look at the recommended books section here, one of my favorites is Harry C. Box' Set Lighting Technician.

Regards, Dave
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