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making an indie film is like asking for spare change..


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#1 Niki Mundo

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 07:37 PM

Nobody is impressed. "Yeah my daughters doing that in college" is what the hardware guys says and he doesn't even look up from his internet (big problem,I lose to the LCD screen all the time). Actors are more often no shows, lots of expressive emails though.
Everyone is like "yeah!" then I ask for some money/commitment/garbage "no,sorry- you should get outta here before I call the cops-Oops! already did".

I know everyone's gotta pay their dues but this from the general public-how dare they! I make art!
What can I use for leverage, I'd love to blackmail them- something like that- something sneaky and mean.

Make sure when the next filmmaker comes along they don't even think twice 'cause they're too scared to say "no".
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#2 Paul Bruening

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 08:51 PM

I sympathize. You are in a large club with many of the rest of us. It is a challenge to not let yourself become too cynical. Just remember, that no one owes you the world just because you're an artist. If you can't get enough peeps to help then make smaller, tighter, and more brilliant productions with less gear and less people. I wish I had a better suggestion. The other alternative is to get bigger and play that even crazier game.
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#3 Saul Rodgar

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 09:20 PM

If accomplishments were easy no one would achieve them, for everyone would be a genius. Where would the challenge be? What would you wake up on the morning for, knowing your every day would be filled with strokes of genius. And after a while it would be BORING and meaningless, as every one else performed the same.

You have got to fight and prove that you got what it takes to be that special one, or just give up and fall by the wayside.

Come on, get a grip, what does the world owe you anyway?
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#4 Christopher Santucci

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 09:27 PM

It's exactly that. Before you prove yourself, nobody will want to give you a dime. And even if you do, it's iffy.

My advice is to figure out a way to self finance and find a great 90 page script and make a great low budget film - after making a bunch of great shorts. Then you can build on that. You can't expect other folks to guarantee your success by investing in a risky venture that's not even unique anymore.

The days of film grants and backers sympathetic to up and coming filmmakers are over. YOU have to make it happen without (much) help which is a very lonely place to be in, but when you pull it off, everything changes.

.
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#5 Chance Shirley

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Posted 19 February 2008 - 11:43 PM

After making a few short movies with friends, I financed my first feature with a MasterCard and it ended up playing a couple of times on the Sci Fi channel. I know that's not a huge success, but it is possible to get a movie made and (somewhat) released on your own.

Now I'm in the process of making my second feature (also financed by MasterCard). I hope that one day somebody else will foot the bill, but I love making movies too much to stop and wait for money.
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#6 Keneu Luca

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 01:30 AM

Move to New York City. Independent filmmakers and struggling artists are embraced here. Plus rent and the cost of living in New York is very inexpensive.

Okay, one of those statements is not true.
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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 04:20 AM

Not the seminal Chuck Shirley movie "Hide and Creep?"

I love stories like that - "I made a movie on a credit card and it played the sci-fi channel."

Only in America....

P
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#8 Jeremy Ford

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 05:24 PM

I love stories like that - "I made a movie on a credit card and it played the sci-fi channel."

Only in America....

P
[/quote]


I made one with cash..lol and it's playing now on Video On Demand. You can order it for $3.99. You have to prooooove yourself young jedi! Even then, it may not work to your advantage. So if you love filmmaking, then just keep making films. One day they will take notice.
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#9 Michael Nash

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 06:29 PM

I know everyone's gotta pay their dues but this from the general public-how dare they! I make art!
What can I use for leverage, I'd love to blackmail them- something like that- something sneaky and mean.

Make sure when the next filmmaker comes along they don't even think twice 'cause they're too scared to say "no".


Yeah, that attitude is gonna win people over.... <_<

Business basics: you ask for money, you provide something of equal value in return.

Sales basics: you have to convince your prospect that they will benefit from your offering -- in some real, measureable way -- that's meaningful to them. That's usually money, but can also be a less tangible asset that makes their life easier.

Human basics: respect is earned, and "god" helps those who help themselves. Command respect by being genuinely worthy of respect.

There are lots of books on indy filmmaking and financing. Once again, you don't have to re-invent the wheel!!
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#10 Richard Boddington

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 06:42 PM

After making a few short movies with friends, I financed my first feature with a MasterCard and it ended up playing a couple of times on the Sci Fi channel. I know that's not a huge success, but it is possible to get a movie made and (somewhat) released on your own.

Now I'm in the process of making my second feature (also financed by MasterCard). I hope that one day somebody else will foot the bill, but I love making movies too much to stop and wait for money.


Actually that IS a huge success and you can be proud of that! I see you got a lot of buzz on IMDB and that means people have watched it, regardless of what they say, being ignored is a far worse fate.

As for Nicky, geez, what can we say....starting your own space program is probably easier than being an indie filmmaker.

R,
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#11 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 07:38 PM

> Actually that IS a huge success and you can be proud of that!

I agree entirely.
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#12 Chance Shirley

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 08:44 PM

Thanks a lot, guys! I appreciate the encouragement, especially as production on my second feature has dragged on for more than a year (so far). That's just one or two weekends a month but, still, a long haul.
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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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