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Supafrost vs. Promist filters


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#1 Mike Medavoy

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 12:53 AM

Hi!

Did anyone shoot with both filters? Are they really that similar? Any shared experiences would be greatly appreciated - similarities, differences and so on. Can you use Supafrosts as substitutes for Promists?

Thanks so muck!

All the best,
Mike

Edited by Mike Medavoy, 21 February 2008 - 12:54 AM.

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#2 Chris Keth

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 01:24 AM

They are pretty similar. if I remember correctly, the supafrosts were a direct predecessor of promists. I have never used supafrosts but I seem to remember them being on some kind of plastic base (?). I remember thinking that was odd for optical filters. Perhaps my information in that area was fallacious.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 01:59 AM

They were plastic filters and thus considered expendable items by the rental houses. The Tiffen ProMist came out later, in glass, and was very similar. The Suprafrost halation was slightly more irregular I recall, as if you mixed a Tiffen ProMist with a Tiffen Soft-FX, but overall, the ProMist is the same filter but in glass.
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#4 Mike Medavoy

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 09:35 AM

Thank you very much for the quick responses!

So, you think there would be a definite (observable) decrease in resolution/optical quality with the Supafrosts, even though the desired effect is more or less the same?

I can get my hands on complete "white" and "black" supafrost sets, and plan to use them on 35mm and also RED in the coming days (full promist sets will be harder to get). But if the plastic material affects the optical quality of the image I would have seconds thoughts. I can test, of course, and the filters seem to be in good condition, physically (no scratches etc).

David, I seem to have read somewhere else that you had direct experience with them. Did they lower the optical quality of the image as opposed to a glass filter?

Thanks again!
Milke
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#5 Chris Keth

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 03:03 PM

You'll have to be ultra careful with them. The plastic will scratch far more easily than glass. That is, I assume, why they were considered expendable.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 03:29 PM

Well, they are diffusion filters, so I'm not sure optimal optical quality is the reason you put one in front of the lens...

I only used them a couple of times back in 1992-3, borrowed from my AC who was carrying some, and only a few shots, but them seemed to work fine for what I was doing at the time. I mean, other types of diffusion like a Mitchell would in some ways have a "blurrier" effect than the lightest SupaFrost, assuming it wasn't all scratched up.
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 21 February 2008 - 09:46 PM

Well, they are diffusion filters, so I'm not sure optimal optical quality is the reason you put one in front of the lens...


:lol: For some reason that conjured up an image of an old time cameraman asking a department store clerk, "pardon me, where are your optical quality stockings?"

Edited by Chris Keth, 21 February 2008 - 09:46 PM.

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