Jump to content


Photo

Outdoor Overhead


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Dennis Lord

Dennis Lord

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 23 February 2008 - 09:59 AM

Hey folks,

currently I'm looking for an butterfly/overhead scrim which is capable for using it outdoor, also during light wind (not storm).
A bunch of sandbags is obligatory, but what frame would you suggest is tough enough?

A friend of mine uses a Manfrotto/Avenger module-frame within his studio, looks and works great. But I dunno if it would work on-location.

I need all sizes, 6x6, 8x8, 12x12 and 20x20

thanks!
dennis
  • 0

#2 Bob Hayes

Bob Hayes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1087 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Culver City, California

Posted 23 February 2008 - 02:42 PM

I don?t know the characteristics of the Manfroto overheads so I can?t comment on how strong they will be. The lighter the frame the easier it is to move around but the less resilient it will be to wind. I have a very light weight 6? x 6? round tube steel frame and a medium weight 8? x 8? square tube aluminum frame. The strength is determined by the thickness of the walls of the tube. I bought the hardware from Modern and went to Industrial Metal, a metal store, for the frame stock. My grip electric package is small enough to load in my SUV. If I need more gear I also need more crew and rent a grip truck.

Since you mentioned 20 x 20 it sounds like you are talking large crew and a lot of resources at your disposal. In addition to a bunch of sand bags you will need two to four high hi combo stands. Over heads are extremely dangerous and wind can come from anywhere. It is a big sail. You need to make sure that it is securely tied down in addition to stands and bags. An iron stake driven into the ground gives a good pick point. A tree is another possible tie off. A sandbag cart with a mess of sand bags and the break on will also work.
  • 0

#3 Dennis Lord

Dennis Lord

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 February 2008 - 06:19 PM

thanks bob :)
manpower isn't no problem, after all the 20x20 is not often in use

my most worries where about that the "sail-effect" could deform the connections or anything.
  • 0

#4 Daniel Wallens

Daniel Wallens
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 214 posts
  • Grip
  • New York City

Posted 24 February 2008 - 11:48 PM

Most any frame/overhead/butterfly that is supplied by a rental house or in a grip kit or truck will be solid enough in, as you say, a "light wind." Most are made out of aluminum, square or round (speed rail), and most are made plenty solid. As long as it's put together correctly and with attention, a light wind will not disrupt the actual integrity of the frame itself.

More important is how the frame is secured and safetied. Please make sure you have grips who know what they are doing, and a key who knows what is safe and what isn't. He or she should be the one worried about how the frame is put together, weighted and tied down, and safety in general. He or she should know when it is not advisable to use a frame of a certain size in certain weather conditions. As long as its properly secured, a light wind should not compromise the integrity of the joints, frame, or hardware in general.

Edited by Daniel Wallens, 24 February 2008 - 11:50 PM.

  • 0


Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Opal

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio