Jump to content


Photo

Question: Short ends/long ends


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Nick Castronuova

Nick Castronuova
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Student

Posted 25 February 2008 - 02:09 AM

Can someone tell me what this means? From what I understand, it's a cheaper way to get film stock. Anyone?
  • 0

#2 Brad Grimmett

Brad Grimmett
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2660 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 February 2008 - 03:54 AM

Short ends are just unused stock from a project that they've sold to a reseller after the project is finished. I believe long ends are basically the same thing, but longer than the normal short ends. Recans are whole rolls that were loaded in a mag but never got shot, so they're no longer factory sealed.
All of these options will be cheaper than buying fresh stock, but there are always possible downsides. There is no guarantee that the stock hasn't been flashed or had some other problem. And sometimes loaders make a mistake and mis-label the can when they unload it, so it says "5218 500T" and it's really "5212 100T". I've heard of this issue before in a few instances.
I had a personal experience with recans on a movie once. We had been shooting for two months (all fresh stock) and then one day during the last week I was doing a steadicam shot and I got the first steadi mag of the day and balanced my rig and we started shooting. When we changed mags the balance was way off on my steadicam (i.e., the mag was lighter) and I couldn't figure out why. Then, during the second or third take we rolled out unexpectedly. I was a bit miffed at the 1st, who had said we had plenty of film for another take. But when we checked the counter it had only rolled around 350 ft. This continued until we finished the scene. What had happened was that the producer had gone behind the DP and 1st's backs and bought re-cans to save money, and all the rolls were short and different lengths. It wasn't the end of the world for me personally, but it wasn't a great situation. Anyway, that's the long winded way of me telling you I'm not a fan of short ends and recans.
If you do end up going this route, just be aware of some of the issues that could arise because of that choice.
  • 0

#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 25 February 2008 - 04:15 AM

Long End = Less than 1000' and more than 700' left from a 1000' Roll

Short End = Less than 400' left, in general

They come cheaper because they've been "handled" and loaded into a mag, then removed as unexposed stock. You might run into issues of a spec of dust here and there, but I've never experience anything tragic the times I've shot short ends.

When spending my own dough, I always buy brand new stock, though.
  • 0

#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 25 February 2008 - 05:51 AM

btw, I don't know where the 700' came from, it's just what I've heard. It would seem anywhere between 400'+ to -1000' would be a "long end"
  • 0


Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

CineLab

Abel Cine

Opal

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

CineTape

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Opal

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets