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motion control with timelaps


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#1 Richard Ladkani

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Posted 25 February 2008 - 02:20 AM

I have seen this kind of shot before but never so often as in the BBCs Planet Earth.
The camera pans across a wideshot of a gran scenery in Scotland and the seasons change from snow to spring to summer to fall in 40seconds. They do it again and again on different locations I want to know what technique hey used. I am guessing a 35mm still camera or a D2 digital on a rotating base plate attached to a computer or something. But I would like to know it excatly if anybody knows.
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Richard
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Edited by Richard Ladkani, 25 February 2008 - 02:20 AM.

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#2 Phil Savoie

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 06:53 AM

I have seen this kind of shot before but never so often as in the BBCs Planet Earth.
The camera pans across a wideshot of a gran scenery in Scotland and the seasons change from snow to spring to summer to fall in 40seconds. They do it again and again on different locations I want to know what technique hey used. I am guessing a 35mm still camera or a D2 digital on a rotating base plate attached to a computer or something. But I would like to know it excatly if anybody knows.
Best
Richard
www.richardladkani.com


On the T/L MoCon sequences I shot for Planet Earth we used a 35mm Arri and a MoSys rig. I know of at least 2 other DPs who also used this gear for PE. http://www.cartoni.c...OSYS_LAMBDA.pdf
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#3 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 09:19 AM

I have seen this kind of shot before but never so often as in the BBCs Planet Earth.
The camera pans across a wideshot of a gran scenery in Scotland and the seasons change from snow to spring to summer to fall in 40seconds. They do it again and again on different locations I want to know what technique hey used. I am guessing a 35mm still camera or a D2 digital on a rotating base plate attached to a computer or something. But I would like to know it excatly if anybody knows.
Best
Richard
www.richardladkani.com


I may be mistaken but i believe they hired the Mo-Sys rig from Kontrol Freax

I remember (I think) Steve Scammel of Kontrol Freax saying they left the track down and returned to them periodicaly, for the multiple pases.
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#4 Tom Lowe

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 09:30 AM

I'm currently in the market for a cheap moco system for my DLSR, to shoot 2- or 3-axis timelapses, with dolly-pan or dolly-pan-tilt. A lot of these systems seems like overkill my modest needs, though. I don't really need repeatability, I just need the camera to move between long-duration night exposures. Any recommendations?
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#5 Serge Teulon

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 01:25 PM

On the T/L MoCon sequences I shot for Planet Earth we used a 35mm Arri and a MoSys rig. I know of at least 2 other DPs who also used this gear for PE. http://www.cartoni.c...OSYS_LAMBDA.pdf



That's a nice rig!

S
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#6 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 02:16 PM

That's a nice rig!

S


Its very small and light-weight too, plus its extremly easy to use. The movements can be operated manually and the computer will record it for playback like a VCR, as well Key-frames and virtual maping too.

It does of course have its limitations too.
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#7 Phil Savoie

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:53 PM

I may be mistaken but i believe they hired the Mo-Sys rig from Kontrol Freax

I remember (I think) Steve Scammel of Kontrol Freax saying they left the track down and returned to them periodicaly, for the multiple pases.


Steve Scammel was the chap - thanks for posting his details. His kit was top notch, easy to use and set up. I reccommend him highly - he was good fun to work with.

cheers,
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#8 Phil Savoie

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 10:07 PM

I'm currently in the market for a cheap moco system for my DLSR, to shoot 2- or 3-axis timelapses, with dolly-pan or dolly-pan-tilt. A lot of these systems seems like overkill my modest needs, though. I don't really need repeatability, I just need the camera to move between long-duration night exposures. Any recommendations?


The problem when going lighter is one of backlash. I don't know of any systems for a DSLR but as they are such a great tool for some TL jobs hopefully someone will come up with something. Until then I can only suggest rigging up a custom X/Y camera stage with stepper motors.
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#9 Nick Mulder

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 03:56 AM

I'm currently in the market for a cheap moco system for my DLSR, to shoot 2- or 3-axis timelapses, with dolly-pan or dolly-pan-tilt. A lot of these systems seems like overkill my modest needs, though. I don't really need repeatability, I just need the camera to move between long-duration night exposures. Any recommendations?

If you have the time and tools:

http://www.cnczone.c...orums/index.php
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#10 Serge Teulon

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 12:44 PM

Its very small and light-weight too, plus its extremly easy to use. The movements can be operated manually and the computer will record it for playback like a VCR, as well Key-frames and virtual maping too.

It does of course have its limitations too.



Do you know if it will time-lapse your movements? Which obviously will be created in real time.......

S
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#11 Andy_Alderslade

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 01:59 PM

Do you know if it will time-lapse your movements? Which obviously will be created in real time.......

S


Yes, you can record the movement in real time, then have the computer play the movement back at a given lower (or higher) frame rate.
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