Jump to content


Photo

advice for Lighting


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Kris Mckay

Kris Mckay

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Producer

Posted 28 February 2008 - 05:28 PM

I am shooting a short film that is a western/pioneer story. I came from the location yesterday in the High Desert of Oregon where I took raw stills of interiors. A large window is in every room and it was really bright enough that I've decided to shoot vision 2 250D for day interiors as well as exteriors. The script does have night interiors and oil lamps and candles is all they would have used. Any advice or help on how to artificially light for this??
Also advice for shooting Exteriors in dry, flat, vast tumbleweedy terrain?
The rooms are ok size but will be wide angle for sure.

specs:
Arri sr2 super 16
vision 200T or ?
Optar Illumina glass


Kristian
  • 0

#2 Dorian Soracco

Dorian Soracco

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 29 February 2008 - 02:11 PM

The script does have night interiors and oil lamps and candles is all they would have used. Any advice or help on how to artificially light for this??


For the night interiors, I would go for a warm, under-exposed key (1/2 to 1 stop under) with a key-fill ratio of about 8:1. I would also recommend a lot of fall-off using nets/flags to subtly boost the accent on the subjects, motivate realistic candle lighting, and create vignetting in the corners of your frame. Maybe use black wrap or a snoot over your lighting units to better focus the light and reduce spill on unwanted areas. I would also suggest playing with a cool moonlight raking across certain parts of the set or subtly backlighting characters. This would be a harder light with a light CTB or steel blue gel.
  • 0

#3 Kevin Mastman

Kevin Mastman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • Student

Posted 29 February 2008 - 03:54 PM

To get the look of lighting from candles or lanterns I would recommend using lights on a flicker box with CTO or straw and lighting the walls or the talents' faces with it. I just got off a set that was lit entirely with "candles" and it worked really well.
  • 0

#4 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 02 March 2008 - 01:53 PM

You could probably get a few dozen recommendations on how to pull that off, here. The main thing is: what will the viewer accept as an appropriate reality of that scene's lighting? I've used a single, gelled fresnel with a guy rolling his fingers across the light path. It worked just fine.
  • 0


Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Visual Products

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Opal

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

CineTape

The Slider

Tai Audio

Opal

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks