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Post workflow with a DI


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#1 Jase Ryan

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 05:57 PM

So this is a basic question, but can someone tell me the exact workflow from shooting to complete post for the cinematographer?

I know, after we shoot the film gets developed, then transfered for offline edit. At what point does the color correction and DI happen? And how do we as cinematographers work with the colorist?

Sorry for the basic question. Thanks.

Jase
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 February 2008 - 06:56 PM

Depends on the production, but generally you adn the colorist work pretty closely. At least that has been my experience. You generally DI/CC after you're at picture lock, but before your throw on titles. Then you rescan the selects you're using and color correct them, and then boom, back out to film, or so I understand it. On smaller projects, say under 3000 ft which are just going to live on video, I often will wind up just putting it all through the Telecine out to an HD master format, then edit an offline (or online is we wind up going to DVCProHD) before conforming. This isn't ideal in the least, but you can do it.

Talk with your post houses in your area, and with the production of what they can afford. And remember, at least in my own experience and opinion, the colorist is another one of your [as a DP] close collaborators. They help you achieve the look you want for the film; and man when you find a good one, they can really blow you away with just the most subtle spin of a wheel!
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#3 Travis Andrade

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Posted 07 March 2008 - 01:14 PM

Depends on the production, but generally you adn the colorist work pretty closely. At least that has been my experience. You generally DI/CC after you're at picture lock, but before your throw on titles. Then you rescan the selects you're using and color correct them, and then boom, back out to film, or so I understand it. On smaller projects, say under 3000 ft which are just going to live on video, I often will wind up just putting it all through the Telecine out to an HD master format, then edit an offline (or online is we wind up going to DVCProHD) before conforming. This isn't ideal in the least, but you can do it.

Talk with your post houses in your area, and with the production of what they can afford. And remember, at least in my own experience and opinion, the colorist is another one of your [as a DP] close collaborators. They help you achieve the look you want for the film; and man when you find a good one, they can really blow you away with just the most subtle spin of a wheel!


Yea and please take advantage of having your colorist and his DaVinci. Please don't settle for CC in Avid. I just shot a film and got screwed because the producer decided tohave the editor and myself work on CC in Avid. There's a difference between an affordable software and a million dollar color correction machine. You're going to pay around $250 an hour but it's worth it. Sort of off topic...sorry
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 07 March 2008 - 03:41 PM

Apple color is haveng the same effect. I like a bit, though, for "polishing," the ultra low budget stuff I shoot sometimes. It'll just be myself and a director/editor, normally and I'll run it through as best I can, putting that whole semester of color correction class to good use. . .
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#5 tylerhawes

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Posted 12 March 2008 - 07:49 PM

Travis I think the biggest way you got screwed was not getting to work with a dedicated colorist and having to ask your editor to do it. DaVinci is a good system, but there are several good systems out there, and I don't even think DaVinci is the best IMHO. You can do a lot even in Color that you can't in a DaVinci. But the point is it takes a unique talent to put it to use.

From my perspective as a Colorist, I think what DPs usually find is that nobody else in the production comes as close to their level of passion and dedication to the image as the colorist. Sure, a visually-oriented Director may also have an intense interest in the image, and any good Director should and will. But they are thinking about a million other things too. It is unique to you (the DP) and I (the Colorist) that we do and are supposed to obsess about the image. In that sense, a good working relationship with a Colorist you find sympatico can be an extremely rewarding experience, because you've found someone to share your work with and revel in it together. I say this because the opposite is true for me, in that I love working with DPs and finiding these talented people who care for the moving image to the same degree that I do.

I recently had one of the most interesting experiences of my career. A DP who I've done 3 features with was up to do another one that a friend of mine was directing. I was invited to participate on set, and was setup with a monitor and scopes so I could observe and actually collaborate with the DP right there while he was setting up. Bringing me into his world was a very cool experience for both of us, and we each walked away saying "this is how it should be done every time", alas if only budget and time permitted. But in this case, it was so interactive between us where he could ask me a question about if I could do X or Y in the DI, and I'd tell him how much we could do. It's hard to explain without specific instances, which I don't remember well. He'd done 3 DIs with me and one with someone else, and he's very technically savvy, so it's not like he didn't have a good idea of what he could do with me when we got to the DI suite. But there was that free flow of information and ideas between us, and it was just a fun time and brought something fresh to the job for both of us I think. I suppose it was ultimately possible only because we had such a good working relationship that he could trust me not to interfere too much, and I on the other hand knew what ideas I could volunteer that were really of value and not obstructing his process (so there's no question who the DP is :).

Anyway, I guess that's far OT, but this thread reminded me of it...

--

Tyler Hawes, Colorist
Liquid DI, Santa Monica
www.liquidcompanies.com
tyler -at- liquidcompanies.com
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Rig Wheels Passport

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Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Opal