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Film Stock Suggestions


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#1 mitchell foster

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 04:34 PM

Hello everyone I have a question about kodak's vision 2 stocks. I am shooting a short on 16mm and trying to decide between the 500t stock and 200t stock. How much of a difference is there really between these stocks? I am planning on shooting mostly indoors without extensive lighting. Although I do have one very short scene outdoors. Is it reasonable to use nd filters on the camera and shoot this scene with either of these stocks or should I buy an extra roll of something slower for this scene even though I won't need the whole roll? I am a student and on a budget so keep that in mind.

Thanks Mitchell Foster
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 05:02 PM

If your lighting kit is rather small, I'd go with the 7218 for interiors. 7217 is beautiful for day exteriors with an 85 filter and ND's or Polarizer. So just work out the ratio of how much interior (500T) stock you'll need and how much for day exteriors (200T). Whatever you don't use you can just short end for future projects anyways.
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#3 Mike Williamson

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 06:08 PM

I personally prefer to use higher speed stock and rate it slower, so my suggestion would be to use 7218 (or Eterna 500T which is also good) and rate it at 320 ASA. I think you get a better look with overexposed 500 speed film than 200 speed film exposed normally, but that's a personal preference.

Using higher speed stock gives you more flexibility with your lighting, so that you can bounce and diffuse your lights and still have enough left to get an exposure. With slower film stock, you end up having to use more direct light just to get the stop, which may work but you'll have fewer options. This becomes especially true when you have a small lighting package and/or a zoom lens with 2.8 minimum aperture.

For the day scene, you can definitely use either '17 or '18 and be fine. On the other hand, you're a student and this is part of your learning process, so I would try to add a roll of slower daylight stock like 7201 so that you can see what another stock looks like. You can always buy several 100' rolls if you think 400' is too much.
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#4 mitchell foster

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Posted 01 March 2008 - 07:48 PM

Thanks for the help

-mitchell
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