Jump to content


Photo

Procedure for on-set checking of HD Monitor?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Jamie Kennerley

Jamie Kennerley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK & Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Posted 02 March 2008 - 11:34 AM

I think I may be asked to do a quick set-up of a Panasonic monitor ( BT-LH1700W HD/SD ) on set in the morning. The assistant on the job went through it quickly with me once, but until I do it myself in anger I won't remember how to do it.

It's a by-eye set-up, using the colour/blue bars to set the levels (matching certain bars in diferent parts of the screen).

Does anyone have a document that explains how to do this - what I'm looking for etc - or a link to a web site please?

Thanks,

Jamie
  • 0

#2 John Ealer

John Ealer
  • Sustaining Members
  • 187 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 02 March 2008 - 11:46 AM

Simply put:

In the same environment you plan on viewing the monitor - i.e. inside / outside / with hoodman, etc.

1. Send SMPTE bars from the camera.
2. Turn on "blue only" function on the monitor.
3. Adjust chroma and phase until the there's no difference in brightness between any sections of the blue bars.
4. Turn off "blue only."
5. On the bottom right of the screen there are three black bars called a "pluge." Adjust brightness until you can just make out the right-most bar. The other two should be indistinguishable from the adjacent black areas.
6. Adjust contrast to eye, until the white block at the bottom left looks "white" and the white bar on the upper left looks slightly less bright than the white block.
7. There's a waveform function on the monitor you can use to double check your exposure, etc.

J
  • 0

#3 Jamie Kennerley

Jamie Kennerley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London, UK & Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Posted 02 March 2008 - 12:01 PM

Thank you John. That all rings a bell to me now!

Regards,

Jamie
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 02 March 2008 - 12:12 PM

Also, if your monitor doesn't have a blue only button, though I think most do, you can do this calibration with a Wratten 47 filer over your eye (i'm 90% sure it's a 47)
  • 0

#5 John Ealer

John Ealer
  • Sustaining Members
  • 187 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 02 March 2008 - 01:06 PM

Also, with the BT-LH1700, as with most Panasonic monitors, there's a gamma setting. For most situations you want it set to NORMAL and not FILM. The FILM mode is usually used when shooting with the Varicam in FILM REC mode.
  • 0

#6 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 02 March 2008 - 04:44 PM

Another thing to watch out for with the BT-LH1700W is the BACKLIGHT setting. In "normal" shooting conditions you'll want the backlight level at a reasonable brightness so that whites appear crisp and contrast appears normal. But in low-light conditions (like night exteriors) too much backlight can fool you into thinking you have more exposure in the deep shadows than you really do. In those situations I've found it's necessary to turn the backlight down until blacks look nice and solid (not milky), double checking against color bars to make sure everything else is still looking correct.
  • 0


Abel Cine

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Opal

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

CineTape

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio