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Getting an "aged" look


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#1 kyle ragaller

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 11:41 PM

I am preparing to shoot a short using Plus-x reversal B/W stock. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with creating a look (texture, contrast) reminiscent of, say, Linden B. Johnson's farewell speech? The late fifties, early sixties, newsreel look. Do people understand the image I am talking about (not sure if it's explained enough)?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:56 AM

I am preparing to shoot a short using Plus-x reversal B/W stock. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with creating a look (texture, contrast) reminiscent of, say, Linden B. Johnson's farewell speech? The late fifties, early sixties, newsreel look. Do people understand the image I am talking about (not sure if it's explained enough)?


I can't find a clip online, but wasn't that broadcast in color? I don't remember. I've seen color stills of the speech. It wasn't really a b&w film newsreel, I think it was a live video broadcast. Maybe you're thinking of the look of a kinescope?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinescope
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#3 Rolando Fernandez

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 03:20 PM

Hi, the kinescope "look" is when a film is taken in front of a tv screen (in sinc. of course)

probably you can telecine using an old vidicon b&w tv camera and get some of the "look"

is this what you look for?

http://www.tvdays.co...tvarchives2.jpg
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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 03:49 PM

I can't find a clip online, but wasn't that broadcast in color? I don't remember. I've seen color stills of the speech. It wasn't really a b&w film newsreel, I think it was a live video broadcast. Maybe you're thinking of the look of a kinescope?


The networks went ALL color in the fall of 1965. Film of Johnson's 1968 speech would have been on Ektachrome EF, as was the Vietnam War.

"By 1960 a gradual shift to color reversal newsfilm had begun. This devlopment followed the implementation and diffusion of color television transmitters and home receiver sets, and added another level of "realism" to television news. "

http://www.museum.tv...newsnetwork.htm
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#5 kyle ragaller

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Posted 07 March 2008 - 04:08 PM

I am preparing to shoot a short using Plus-x reversal B/W stock. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with creating a look (texture, contrast) reminiscent of, say, Linden B. Johnson's farewell speech? The late fifties, early sixties, newsreel look. Do people understand the image I am talking about (not sure if it's explained enough)?


A much better example of the image I am looking for comes from the opening sequence to PTA's Magnolia. The first tale of coincidence of the three men killing the shop owner. What did PTA use there to create those images?

Kyle.
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#6 Jim Carlile

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Posted 08 March 2008 - 04:15 AM

I am preparing to shoot a short using Plus-x reversal B/W stock. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with creating a look (texture, contrast) reminiscent of, say, Linden B. Johnson's farewell speech? The late fifties, early sixties, newsreel look. Do people understand the image I am talking about (not sure if it's explained enough)?


That was on TV (gawd I feel old just to know that...) It was late 60's which was totally different than 50's. Just like now except that pre-cable TV aerials might have given it a crappy look somewhere.

Nothing we have now looks as bad as a 1952 kinescope. It would be hard to duplicate-- maybe shoot a TV image through an old glass bubble or something. That part of the Magnolia prologue looks like it was shot 16mm.

To duplicate the LBJ look, shoot the scene on VHS, play through a TV, and film the TV. Use an XL camera with a big shutter angle to eliminate strobbing. Shoot at 18fps. If you shoot at 24, the exposures will be too tight and won't catch the whole video scan.
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#7 John Brawley

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Posted 08 March 2008 - 08:23 AM

The networks went ALL color in the fall of 1965.



Really ? I thought colour was introduced in 1975 that it happened...no wait...that was in Australia...( hey..we don't all get to live in the US)

I don't know how you'd do it on super 8, but reversing the film and shooting though the base can give a fairly..*vintage* look.....

jb
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#8 Jim Carlile

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Posted 09 March 2008 - 03:31 AM

The networks went ALL color in the fall of 1965


Not all (I'm really showing my age....)

A few stayed on as B/W-- the Munsters and the Addams Family come to mind. Their last season was in 65-66. Lost in Space was B/W its first season in 65-66. Dick van Dyke stayed B/W its last 65-66 season. Any others?

What happened is that pre-65 only a few American shows were in color-- Bonanza, Disney, some sports, a few others. In '65 they went universally color but with a few exceptions as noted.
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