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Arri-S 16mm


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#1 Helmut Glew

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:00 AM

Hi there,
Can anybody tell me how to remove the film gate to my Arri-S? I have the 8 tiny screws off but don't know what more I need to do.

I am trying to convert to Ultra-16:

http://marylandfilms...6-compared.html

http://marylandfilms...g-to-bono-labs/

http://konvas.org/pi...ust/002410.html

Thanks in advance for your help,
Helmut
www.FuseBoxFilms.com
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 12:12 AM

To remove the gate from an Arriflex 16S you need to disassemble the entire camera, remove the movement, remove the registration pin, remove the side pressure rail.

At this point it takes special tools and special knowledge to put the camera back together again. The movement needs to be rebuilt and re-timed. The camera needs to be reassembled and the flange focal distance and the ground glass needs to be re-set.

This is just my personal opinion mind you but I can think of few things as stupid and destructive as Ultra-16. It's someone's idea of a bad joke and I would NEVER alter a camera in that way. Not only are there few to no labs that have a telecine gate that can handle the odd frame size, but unless you go in and relieve most of the surfaces in the film path, you can get scratching in the two areas of the film where you have removed gate material.

It is very simple to shoot 16:9 with an Arriflex 16S just the way it left the factory, and any other regular 16 camera for that matter.

Just to repeat, I WOULD NEVER ALTER A CAMERA FOR ULTRA-16. It's the stupidest thing I've ever heard of.

Best,
-Tim
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#3 Helmut Glew

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 01:16 AM

Thanks for the info. It's not too late to halt what I'm doing, I just removed the 8 small screws, which I can put back easily enough.

I only know of Ultra-16 what I've read on the internet. I'll look into it some more. I'm curious as to what your opinion is of Super-16. I wanted to go in that direction but it's expensive and some of my lenses I understand aren't capable of the conversion.

Thanks again!
Helmut


To remove the gate from an Arriflex 16S you need to disassemble the entire camera, remove the movement, remove the registration pin, remove the side pressure rail.

At this point it takes special tools and special knowledge to put the camera back together again. The movement needs to be rebuilt and re-timed. The camera needs to be reassembled and the flange focal distance and the ground glass needs to be re-set.

This is just my personal opinion mind you but I can think of few things as stupid and destructive as Ultra-16. It's someone's idea of a bad joke and I would NEVER alter a camera in that way. Not only are there few to no labs that have a telecine gate that can handle the odd frame size, but unless you go in and relieve most of the surfaces in the film path, you can get scratching in the two areas of the film where you have removed gate material.

It is very simple to shoot 16:9 with an Arriflex 16S just the way it left the factory, and any other regular 16 camera for that matter.

Just to repeat, I WOULD NEVER ALTER A CAMERA FOR ULTRA-16. It's the stupidest thing I've ever heard of.

Best,
-Tim


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#4 Tim Carroll

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 09:45 AM

Do an archive search for articles about Ultra-16. The topic has been beat to death over the years. Again, I think it is the stupidest thing you could ever do to a motion picture camera.

If you have the option of shooting regular 16 or Super 16, and you have a regular 16 camera available to you and a Super 16 camera available to you, then I would choose the Super 16 camera because you get more information on the negative for the same cost in film stock.

If you only have a regular 16 camera available to you but you still want to shoot 16:9 (widescreen), then follow the steps laid out on the web site and shoot widescreen:

Shooting 16:9 with an Arriflex 16S

To see clips shot in 16:9 with a regular 16 Arriflex 16S, take a look at this page:

16:9 film clips shot with (regular 16) Arriflex 16S

And finally, if you want to shoot Super 16, I would not try to convert your Arriflex 16S to Super 16. Here's why:

Why not to convert an Arriflex 16S to Super 16

Best,
-Tim
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#5 Helmut Glew

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 05:11 PM

Looks like you win. Thanks again for the info. With the exception of the mag bumping the operator's face, the Arri-S is a great camera. I guess I'll leave it stock. BTW, anyone know where to find a 10mm prime, Arri-mount? Some students broke mine. Perhaps I can trade. I have tons of parts and odds and ends. Much of it CP-related parts. Some of it pretty ancient.


Do an archive search for articles about Ultra-16. The topic has been beat to death over the years. Again, I think it is the stupidest thing you could ever do to a motion picture camera.

If you have the option of shooting regular 16 or Super 16, and you have a regular 16 camera available to you and a Super 16 camera available to you, then I would choose the Super 16 camera because you get more information on the negative for the same cost in film stock.

If you only have a regular 16 camera available to you but you still want to shoot 16:9 (widescreen), then follow the steps laid out on the web site and shoot widescreen:

Shooting 16:9 with an Arriflex 16S

To see clips shot in 16:9 with a regular 16 Arriflex 16S, take a look at this page:

16:9 film clips shot with (regular 16) Arriflex 16S

And finally, if you want to shoot Super 16, I would not try to convert your Arriflex 16S to Super 16. Here's why:

Why not to convert an Arriflex 16S to Super 16

Best,
-Tim


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Willys Widgets

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Glidecam

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

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