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Lighting a bright morning


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#1 DjDecibul

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 02:55 AM

Hey all. I'm working on a film for a district wide film festival. I am a student film maker who is a freshmen @ Hoover High School in Glendale,CA and I would like to know how to light those. Bright and shining summer morning shots. With those powerful exposures. Can someone please help me out?

Thank you,
Carl Ghazarian :)
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#2 jeffrey Siljenberg

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 03:07 AM

Sure a couple of questions though what do you mean by powerful? Do you have any visual refrences in mind, movies you've seen or photos? Int. or Ext. ?Generally if its morning keep the light not to high above eye level as you don't want it ot look like 12 noon. i useually like 6 stops or so difference between light and shadow depending on the film stock or Camera if your shooting digital. Hope that helps. Enjoy your show.
Kindest Regards,
Jeff

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Hey all. I'm working on a film for a district wide film festival. I am a student film maker who is a freshmen @ Hoover High School in Glendale,CA and I would like to know how to light those. Bright and shining summer morning shots. With those powerful exposures. Can someone please help me out?

Thank you,
Carl Ghazarian :)


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#3 rohtash chandel

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 05:08 AM

Sure a couple of questions though what do you mean by powerful? Do you have any visual refrences in mind, movies you've seen or photos? Int. or Ext. ?Generally if its morning keep the light not to high above eye level as you don't want it ot look like 12 noon. i useually like 6 stops or so difference between light and shadow depending on the film stock or Camera if your shooting digital. Hope that helps. Enjoy your show.
Kindest Regards,
Jeff

www.jeffsiljenberg.com

i think the contrast ratio depends up on the kind of location we are shooting in, we shot some early morning scenes recently, one of the room we shot in had windows on three sides which justifies the lower ratio as you will have ambient light coming in through rest two windows and i feel morning sunlight in addition to warmness has little softness to it, and does not cast sharp shadows,
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#4 DjDecibul

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 08:50 PM

It is an interior shot. In a bed room about 8' by 8'. I have 3 tungsten lights and will be filming at about 2 PM. I basically want to get this type of shot. Like I want to cast a powerful ambient light to symbolize the bright morning look. How can I do this?
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 12:07 AM

If all you have are some small tungsten lights, you can't create that big sunlight effect -- your best bet would be to shoot when the sun is actually coming in, or use a 4'x4' mirrorboard or silver reflector and reflect the sunlight in.
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#6 DjDecibul

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 12:23 AM

I see, could you please send me a link of this reflector?

Thanks,
Carl Ghazarian
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 12:25 AM

http://www.bhphotovi...tor_42x42_.html
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#8 Drew Ott

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 01:11 AM

I see, could you please send me a link of this reflector?

Thanks,
Carl Ghazarian



Or if you're on a tight budget you can buy some insulation boards at a hardware store. They have a silver reflective side that has worked well for me.

You may want to back the non-reflective side with something sturdier though, because they will want to snap if in the wind.
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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 01:57 AM

Or if you're on a tight budget you can buy some insulation boards at a hardware store. They have a silver reflective side that has worked well for me.

You may want to back the non-reflective side with something sturdier though, because they will want to snap if in the wind.


You can also spraypaint the other side with cheapo silver paint. It makes a pretty good soft side. Make sure to use the really cheap silver because the more expensive silvers actually dry too perfect and shiny for a soft side of the board.
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#10 Andrew Koch

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Posted 23 March 2008 - 05:47 AM

Another thing you could do is get a piece of 4x4 cardboard or Styrofoam and tape silver mylar to one side of it. Mylar is that stuff that that they make those shiny party balloons out of. Mylar is great because it is highly reflective (Mylar can be a bit pricey however, so if you can, just get a sheet big enough to fill the cardboard rather than an entire roll. I am not sure exactly where to purchase this stuff, but studio depot or filmtools probably has it)

If you have the money to rent a mirror board or shiny board, it will be easier to control and would most likely work better, but I listed the above as a possibly cheaper alternative.

Also, please change your screen name to your first and last name because it is a requirement for the forum.

I hope this helps and good luck
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