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tungsten in the morning


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#1 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 05:02 PM

which stock would be a good choice for reproducing a similar look... my guess is shooting tungsten in the early morning uncorrected. thoughts and input appreciateded thanks

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 05:22 PM

which stock would be a good choice for reproducing a similar look... my guess is shooting tungsten in the early morning uncorrected. thoughts and input appreciateded thanks

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Yes, or shooting at twilight -- though I actually think this is a day-for-night shot with a Pola to darken the sky.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 06:07 PM

Can I ask which film you got this grab from, it looks familiar.
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#4 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:08 PM

Can I ask which film you got this grab from, it looks familiar.



Heat, shot by Dante Spinotti... any ideas on which stock would be a good choice? Also, on a SLR how would I simulate pushing one stop?
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#5 John Brawley

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:09 PM

which stock would be a good choice for reproducing a similar look... my guess is shooting tungsten in the early morning uncorrected. thoughts and input appreciateded thanks


This looks a lot like a day for night with very heavily ND'd windows, shooting tungsten balanced. It looks like you can see some shadows from the shadows on the walkway from the white posts. Sun is high camera left.

Then a little something for the back of the actor's head from inside, also daylight balanced.

jb

I just saw that you later posted it was shot by Dante Spinotti. I did a workshop with him a few years ago and he talked about doing night interiors this way all the time. he has tinted or ND perspex made for the windows in a location, usually about 5-6 stops. Take a look at Bandits....there's a lot of this kind of DFN in there as well.

Edited by John Brawley, 05 March 2008 - 07:25 PM.

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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:21 PM

Any tungsten stock would be fine -- if it's day for night, you might as well go for 100T.

You'd just take your DSLR photo on tungsten balance, underexpose it, and add some contrast in Photoshop for more of a pushed look.

I don't think there's any reason to ND the windows unless you were balancing with some practicals inside. When it's all daylight like that, you can just use traditional day-for-night tricks.
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#7 Max Jacoby

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:41 PM

There is an article in the January 1996 edition of AC. The whole film was shot on 5298 500T, night exteriors and interiors were pushed one stop.
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#8 Joshua Dannais

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 07:45 PM

Any tungsten stock would be fine -- if it's day for night, you might as well go for 100T.

You'd just take your DSLR photo on tungsten balance, underexpose it, and add some contrast in Photoshop for more of a pushed look.

I don't think there's any reason to ND the windows unless you were balancing with some practicals inside. When it's all daylight like that, you can just use traditional day-for-night tricks.



David, What I've been doing research for is something that i want to shoot very early in the morning using sodium vapor street lamps. I'm trying for a darkly lit foreground against a very saturated blue sky. I would like to shoot without any filters using a zeiss super speed. I'm going to use a nikon SLR for some scout type stills, hence the SLR question... do you think shooting around 1.3 and using a fast stock, possibly pushing one stop, it is possible to achieve a similar look?

John, thanks... I'll grab a copy of Bandits when I get a chance.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 08:16 PM

Sure it's possible. Dusk / magic hour has a constantly changing level minute by minute, so I'm sure at one moment, the sky is as dark as that at T/1.3 on 500T stock.

I did several takes of a guy riding his bike down a street at dusk and, on 500 ASA stock pushed one-stop and rated at 640 ASA, the first take was at T/8 and the last take was at T/1.4 -- that's a five-stop light change in about a fifteen-minute window...
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#10 Filip Orlandic

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Posted 08 March 2008 - 12:27 PM

Maybe you should try new Fuji stock "Vivid 160". It is also tungsten.

ETERNA Vivid 160 Features

1. High color saturation
An evolved version of ETERNA series' Super Efficient DIR-Coupler Technology promotes adhesion and separation of colors, creating a rich, vibrant, and translucent color palette.
2. Excellent image sharpness
The performance parameters of the proprietary technologies developed for the ETERNA family of motion picture color negative films have been optimized, achieving exceptional sharpness. High contrast and highly saturated color boosts image sharpness, creating motion picture images with exceptional depth and dimension.
3. Optimized gradation balance
ETERNA Vivid 160 produces balanced, attractive skin tones and grays across a wide range of exposure conditions.
4. High contrast
Compared to the other Fujifilm Eterna based motion picture color negative films, ETERNA Vivid 160 is characterized by high contrast, which when combined with a highly saturated color palette will produce rich, vivid colors and crisp, deep blacks desired for today's theatrical films.
5. Enhanced telecine characteristics
Enhanced linear response and excellent color balance minimize the need for color adjustment during telecine transfer. Optimization of orange mask density and sharpness balance results in improved scanning characteristics, producing crisp, clear prints and minimizing noise during film scanning.
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