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Morning for Afternoon


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#1 ML Scott

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Posted 11 March 2008 - 06:14 AM

Hi all,

I am shooting a short, and scheduling has dictated that we must shoot a scene which is meant to be mid to late afternoon in the morning (around 830 til 11). Wondering if anyone has any specific advice about shooting Morning for Afternoon.

The whole scene will be shot using NATURAL LIGHT, using bounce, sails, and neg fill. I assume that the position of the Sun won't be a massive issue with regards to time of day as long as it is low and not overhead. If this isn't the case any advice would be greatly appreciated.

I was thinking of using some soft edge horizontal grads to warm up the skyline.

The time (in the script) is meant to be after school time (so 3:30-4:30).

Thanks all,

Michael.

Edited by ML Scott, 11 March 2008 - 06:14 AM.

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#2 Tom Lowe

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Posted 11 March 2008 - 11:45 AM

It shouldn't be any different.

Unless it takes place on a coastline, you need not worry about the placement of the sun.

But problems can happen. For example, in the movie Wall Street, Gordon Gekko is supposed to be talking to Bud Fox at sunrise, as Gekko gazes out at the ocean. He's supposed to be on the east coast, so why is the sun BEHIND him in the West?

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Sometimes the smog built up over a day in places like LA might make for a more spectacular sunset (because of all the particles in the air), but other than that, an early morning shoot should be similar to an afternoon shoot, I would think.

Edited by Tom Lowe, 11 March 2008 - 11:46 AM.

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#3 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 11 March 2008 - 02:08 PM

I am shooting a short, and scheduling has dictated that we must shoot a scene which is meant to be mid to late afternoon in the morning (around 830 til 11). Wondering if anyone has any specific advice about shooting Morning for Afternoon.


If there's a sundial in the shot, rotate it 180 degrees.
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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 11 March 2008 - 02:10 PM

But problems can happen. For example, in the movie Wall Street, Gordon Gekko is supposed to be talking to Bud Fox at sunrise, as Gekko gazes out at the ocean. He's supposed to be on the east coast, so why is the sun BEHIND him in the West?


It was an homage to John Wayne's 'The Green Berets'.
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