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Chroma in a tight budget


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#1 Malik Sajid

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 04:38 PM

arrright, i have got this program that i am going to produce for a local tv channel. its a sports programs by the way, covering past 24 hours games happened.

its taking place in an empty office(used to be accountant's office), i am placing my chroma sheet in a corner, so we can shoot diagonally, and get the maximum distance. i have got only six lights, 1000 watt tungsten. what i m thinking of is use 2 lights separately on the either side of the chroma sheet with some butter paper on them to get equal even light on the sheet. Then place my character as much away as i can. placing key on the right of the character with a butter paper on, a fill may be, and a back light to separate it from the background. i want a n even light on the character as well with no shadows on it.


sdfa_copy.jpg

i am attaching a diagram as well....check it out....what do u say?
your thoughts are highly appreciated.
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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 05:56 PM

Hello Saj,

I see you're new here, so please take a moment to re-read the forum rules that you agreed to when you registered: http://www.cinematog...?act=boardrules . Please let us know if there's anything there that's unclear.

Your lighting diagram seems pretty straight forward. My only concern would be that the lights illuminating your chroma screen can cover it evenly, without any hot spots. You don't say what kind of lights you're using (fresnels, open-faced, etc.). You'll probably want to use some diffusion and flags to even out and control the light in such a small space.
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#3 Walter Graff

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 09:44 PM

Looks good. you'll have to decide if you need the hair light based on what the back plate will be. I have an article about a similar set up here if it helps:

http://www.bluesky-w...reenscreen.html
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#4 Malik Sajid

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 02:54 AM

Hello Saj,

I see you're new here, so please take a moment to re-read the forum rules that you agreed to when you registered: http://www.cinematog...?act=boardrules . Please let us know if there's anything there that's unclear.

Your lighting diagram seems pretty straight forward. My only concern would be that the lights illuminating your chroma screen can cover it evenly, without any hot spots. You don't say what kind of lights you're using (fresnels, open-faced, etc.). You'll probably want to use some diffusion and flags to even out and control the light in such a small space.


yah Nash! i understand , and i just changed my display name, though i dont go by my full name instead i work and known as my short name, that is saj....but anyways i changed it....and thanks bro


let me tell u, its a static mid shot of a anchor person(news style) standing in front of the chroma screen, (i10 x 8 ft. sheet fixed on a frame) There will be some graphical animation on the background after key the green in final output. i have open face lights, and yes with diffusion material, i have butter papers in my bags.
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#5 Malik Sajid

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 02:58 AM

Looks good. you'll have to decide if you need the hair light based on what the back plate will be. I have an article about a similar set up here if it helps:

http://www.bluesky-w...reenscreen.html




i will have graphic animation behind, logo may be, i dont know, the creative people are working on it............yes m not sure if i need a hair light or not, may be on spot we'll decide it. i will test before final shoot, and will try to post the stills here.

what u say?
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#6 Chad Stockfleth

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 01:22 PM

If you end up not needing the fill light (or perhaps use a bounce board) you could use that light as a kicker opposite side of your backlight. Just a thought.

cheers!
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#7 Bill Totolo

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Posted 19 March 2008 - 12:48 AM

arrright, i have got this program that i am going to produce for a local tv channel. its a sports programs by the way, covering past 24 hours games happened.

its taking place in an empty office(used to be accountant's office), i am placing my chroma sheet in a corner, so we can shoot diagonally, and get the maximum distance. i have got only six lights, 1000 watt tungsten. what i m thinking of is use 2 lights separately on the either side of the chroma sheet with some butter paper on them to get equal even light on the sheet. Then place my character as much away as i can. placing key on the right of the character with a butter paper on, a fill may be, and a back light to separate it from the background. i want a n even light on the character as well with no shadows on it.


sdfa_copy.jpg

i am attaching a diagram as well....check it out....what do u say?
your thoughts are highly appreciated.


The setup looks pretty straight forward, this is how I shoot all those "I love the 80's" style clip shows for E!, this is also how we've lit our "Breaking News" station.

1k's may be more firepower than you need but you can always net or scrim them down.

I've been finding that not all green screens are created equal so take note of how reflective the material is. Obviously, the more refelective, the more potential for (green) spill.
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#8 Malik Sajid

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 11:49 PM

The setup looks pretty straight forward, this is how I shoot all those "I love the 80's" style clip shows for E!, this is also how we've lit our "Breaking News" station.

1k's may be more firepower than you need but you can always net or scrim them down.

I've been finding that not all green screens are created equal so take note of how reflective the material is. Obviously, the more refelective, the more potential for (green) spill.



yesterday we did our test shoot on chroma. unfortunately the set person made a light blue colored sheet, its reflects a lot. This reflection is creating a lot of pain, and i m not been able to kill the outline around the character(i think character is at quite a distance).
i will try to test with character at more distance today, and will try to post the stills.

please suggest me how can i have kill that outline?
waiting
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#9 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:25 AM

Is the light blue sheet your chroma key screen?
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#10 Malik Sajid

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:36 AM

yes..............i was unaware of the color...........the set person did it by his own.......and m made at him.........cant change it that early now....so have to test things on it...........
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#11 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 01:32 AM

yes..............i was unaware of the color...........the set person did it by his own.......and m made at him.........cant change it that early now....so have to test things on it...........


I will preface my suggestion with this one thing: definitely test this!

If the sheet is very light, you should be able to kill the reflection problem as well as get a little bit better color saturation on film/video by underexposing the sheet compared to your subject. Try and get it to spotmeter at right about your shooting stop or perhaps a little less. You don't want it so far under that it gets noisy, though. If the color is really light, you may just have to have it redyed. Ideally, you want a very saturated, primary green or blue.

The other key (no pun intended) to cutting the reflected light from the screen is simply to add space between the subject and the screen. Physics will take care of it for you.
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#12 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 26 March 2008 - 04:05 AM

You can also illuminate it with blue light, which in my experience makes for a big improvement anyway. You could practically use a white screen.

P
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#13 hector aldana

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 08:10 PM

You can also illuminate it with blue light, which in my experience makes for a big improvement anyway. You could practically use a white screen.

P


First: Hi everyone. I'm new in here, and im chilean. i dont speak very well english.(is just an advise)

Im about to do a film enterily in chroma. I havent got the chance to do tests yet, but in theory i have some ideas.

A color correction filter could help in this case? How possible could that be? (thining in a green chroma)

I havent got too much experience in chroma key.
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#14 Michael Nash

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 08:21 PM

A color correction filter could help in this case? How possible could that be? (thining in a green chroma)


I'm not sure if you mean a color correction filter on the camera, or color correction gel on your lights.

You don't want to use a color correction filter on the camera. You want to get as much color difference between your greenscreen and your subject as possible, and a filter can only limit that. You would only use a color correction filter to match the balance of the film stock to the color temperature of the light, if need be.

You can use colored gel to add saturation to your chroma screen, but it usually isn't necessary.
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