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Beach Scene 7212


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#1 Dan Riordan

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 10:45 PM

Hi,

I'll be shooting a short student film on 16mm in april and one of the scenes takes place on a beach. I'm planning on using ND's to get some nice shallow dof shots but that's about all i have in mind.

I was hoping to get some suggestions on what time of day to shoot and what filters I should use, and anything else I should know. I'll be shooting on a bolex. Thanks.
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#2 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 11:04 PM

Having a polarizer will give you some options.

Time of day? Isn't that up to your shot context? Late day soft light, harsh mid-day overhead "hot" or early sunrise or sunset. Pick something that fits. Of course time will be a factor with most of those. It's worth it to plan a little.
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#3 Tom Lowe

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Posted 17 March 2008 - 11:39 AM

There is another thread very similar to this. And again, there are so few details here as to be frustrating.
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#4 Dan Riordan

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 12:51 AM

I apologize for the lack of details. I was looking for basic things to avoid, etc.

I need to shoot a scene facing west on the shore of lake michigan ( thats on the michigan side looking roughly in the direction of Chicago). The characters will be looking out to the west as well. Most of the shots in this scene will be from behind them looking west. There will probably be a few shots of their faces looking out. I'm wondering if it would be best to shoot them in the morning so as to have the sun lighting their backsides since this will be what we see most. As for the few shots of their faces looking out, I thought I could bounce some light in, or shoot it later in the day.

I will also be shooting a scene where they will be walking through large sand dunes to reach the shore. Will I be okay filming these scenes later in the day even though in the film they will come before the shore scene? Will the light temperature be very different? you will not see the lake in these shots or have a real sense of space.

Also, what about exposure? I'm using a sekonic studio light meter. Will the sand be blown out if it's a sunny day? Whats the best way to find the correct exposure when shooting in sand? I know I'll probably be getting a lot of reflected light from the sand. I'm shooting with 7212.

Thanks.
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#5 Kiarash Sadigh

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Posted 27 March 2008 - 10:19 PM

Shoot them around the sunset time, if the story allows. I would get my wide from behind the actors, throwing the drama of all those colours in sky in the back ground...besides you get a nice backlit look when the sun hits their hair and shoulders....some people like the flare from the sun some people don't... but you can always throw the long lens and move back to control your lensflare a bit more. I would also shoot the tights first and then, when the right time comes, move to the wide to capture the scenic.
For your wide shot you can expose for back ground and throw your actors about 2 1/2 to 3 stop under to get a nice sliouette...to do this you can put the lumi disc on and meassure the incident light facing the camera (camera is facing west so your light meter should face east at this point) also make sure that your lumi disc or sphere is not being hit but the direct sun, then iris down for about 2 1/2 to 3 stops from what you read...hope it helps.
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#6 Dan Riordan

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 02:58 AM

Thanks for your help Kiarash. I am using my wide on the shore scene but I have opted to avoid the standard sunset scene. I think it might be too conventional for this film and i might not have enough time. I've got one day to film.
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#7 Kiarash Sadigh

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 03:12 PM

Thanks for your help Kiarash. I am using my wide on the shore scene but I have opted to avoid the standard sunset scene. I think it might be too conventional for this film and i might not have enough time. I've got one day to film.


Sure, although the incident measuring technique will still be valid if you want to retain some details/colours in the sky...good luck.
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