Jump to content


My Viewfinder Dream


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 kalkarman

kalkarman
  • Guests

Posted 19 March 2008 - 02:23 AM

Howdy, I just can't seem to get what I dream of:

A viewfnder that is a thin 16:9 LCD screen that I can either hang around my neck or strap to my forearm. That screen would have a lightweight but durable battery, and be connected wireless to the camera. I imagine somethng in size and feel like the playstation portable, or imagine a longer, slightly bigger iphone.

A final need would be a small camera, like that on your cellphone, to take frames, and record temporary videos to try out camera movements.

Anyone out there know if my dream viewfinder exists??

Many thanks,

Kal
  • 0

#2 Michael Collier

Michael Collier
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1262 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 19 March 2008 - 04:40 AM

Well you could combine a small LCD,a UHF transmitter, a tiny digital camera, a clamshell recorded, a panaframe, some sort of archers wrist guard, lots of duct tape. But at that point it would start to look like a one man band rig. Did I mention lots of duct tape? That's kinda important.

I just want a transmitter that works in 802.11 b/g mode and can send images to my I touch. That way I can check the frame and space without walking back to the camera or monitor. That and every film tool made out of antimantium. I always seem to find all gears engineering limit. One day gear will be antimantium 'collier proof' construction. Now if they could make it mike 'biffy' bergstrom proof' that would be good to. But that would be pushing even antimantiums limit.
  • 0

#3 Sam Wells

Sam Wells
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1751 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 March 2008 - 09:36 AM

A final need would be a small camera, like that on your cellphone, to take frames, and record temporary videos to try out camera movements.



Maybe this ?

http://www.dcviews.c...amsung-NV24.htm


-Sam
  • 0

#4 kalkarman

kalkarman
  • Guests

Posted 22 March 2008 - 05:20 AM

I think there is this very real gap in the industry. Directors want to be free on set, and not chained down to a chair. What we end up doing a lot is holding a clamshell next to camera, operating the camera itself, or just peeking over the focus puller's head and watching his mini LCD.

With the technology that is out there, I'm sure a product that I'm describing could be built:

1) size and weight of PSP (playstation portable)
2) wireless video reception of A & B Cameras
3) with small cellphone like lens to take digital stills, and record brief videos. Also displaying lens size like any viewfinder for various formats.
4) automatic recording of takes, and multiple frame rate renders like Vantage's PSU (http://www.pagelocat...ocation/psu.htm)


I think directors would pay handsomly for a product this well made. I think existing monitors are caught up in lots of Inputs and outputs. I think industry should concentrate on a wireless device. If the battery weighs too much, I for one would have no problem swapping batteries every two hours or so.... thus keeping weight down on the product.


Is there really no company out there developing such products for directors??

Really curious,

Kal
  • 0

#5 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11939 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 March 2008 - 09:01 AM

I am putting together some monitors of my own right now for video assist work - 7" LCDs with batteries about the same size on the back, so bigger than what you're talking about. They're nothing special.

The problems with doing this sort of thing are manifold:

- The RF links break up. You can have a link that will break up little or not at all, but it will cost more than anyone is willing to pay.
- It becomes a great rickety pile of gear. I'm having cordura shoulder bags made up for the monitor, battery and receiver. You can have a nice integrated unit in a custom-built hard case, but it will cost more than anyone is willing to pay.
- If you can't charge a battery faster than you can discharge it, you need either at least three per monitor or enough to run 14-16 hours. You cannot use
full size broadcast camera batteries because most of them are too big and those that aren't cost too much, so you have to either buy something cheaper or roll your own.

Basically the problem is that the fee for video assist is what it is and adding more kit to the job doesn't really allow you to charge more. Beyond the basics of presenting equipment which is tidy and reliable, there is a huge gap until you get to a point where you can afford to do it "properly". It is, at the end of the day, only a preview - until it gets to the point where the director decides he really really wanted to see that take...

P
  • 0

#6 kalkarman

kalkarman
  • Guests

Posted 22 March 2008 - 12:29 PM

Idea: I see many basic small video cameras have DV IN .

What could be the smallest, battery powered video transmitter on the market to plug into it?

Perhaps there's been some development on this in the steadi cam business?

Curious,

Kal
  • 0

#7 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:09 AM

Abel has come up with a solution for Kal.

A 7" LCD monitor that runs on small camcorder batteries and has a built-in tuner. A UHF transmitter from his video camera. It is small, inexpensive and works very well.
  • 0

#8 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11939 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:23 AM

Is that a built in 2.4GHz tuner or a conventional UHF tuner?

P
  • 0

#9 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 24 March 2008 - 10:27 AM

Conventional UHF. Yes there will be signal interference & breakup, but it is inexpensive and generally works very well.
  • 0

#10 John Sprung

John Sprung
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4635 posts
  • Other

Posted 24 March 2008 - 03:32 PM

Conventional UHF.

Is it kosher with the FCC?



-- J.S.
  • 0

#11 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3070 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 March 2008 - 03:39 PM

Directors want to be free on set, and not chained down to a chair.


There was a time when Directors just stood next to camera and watched the performance. They knew what the frame was and trusted the operator....

The last time that happened to me was at film school, because none of our cameras had video assist.

Bliss.
  • 0

#12 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 March 2008 - 09:05 PM

There was a time when Directors just stood next to camera and watched the performance. They knew what the frame was and trusted the operator....

The last time that happened to me was at film school, because none of our cameras had video assist.

Bliss.


What I would give for a day I didn't have to hassle with monitors. I think I'm on the worst show for that ever. It's a reality show where we NEED wireless transmitters (lots of off the cuff movement with many characters, 2 or 3 cameras, lots of places and situations where a BNC just trips people up) but we have a (yes only one for 2 or 3 cameras) little hardwired monitor instead.

To the OP: Have you checked out the RED LCD? I assume it will work with cameras other than the red. When I used it, I was surprised how small and light it is, and how sharp it looks. It's not nearly as mushy looking as other LCDs I have used.
  • 0

#13 Mitch Gross

Mitch Gross
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 26 March 2008 - 12:14 PM

The RED LCD will only work on the RED camera. The reason it is so light is that it just a panel in a casing. All the drivers are located inside the camera. Smart design for the system, but not if you want to use the LCD elsewhere.
  • 0

#14 Chris Keth

Chris Keth
  • Sustaining Members
  • 4427 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Los Angeles

Posted 31 March 2008 - 12:26 AM

The RED LCD will only work on the RED camera. The reason it is so light is that it just a panel in a casing. All the drivers are located inside the camera. Smart design for the system, but not if you want to use the LCD elsewhere.


That's a shame. I was impressed with it and thought it might be a good little LCD to own, but not if it only works with one camera. Thanks for the clarification, Mitch.
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

The Slider

Opal

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies